In this Thursday, Feb. 17, 2011 photo, astrologer Wendy Stacey poses with star charts she drew up for Kate Middleton and Prince William at her home in Beaconfield, England.The stars haven’t aligned for astrologers in the age of COVID-19. The pandemic has forced some writers and editors to move mountains — or in this case, planets — to have future horoscopes reflect the changing times. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP/Sang Tan

Stars not aligned for astrologers during COVID-19, as horoscopes dish outdated advice

Longtime columnist says it’s important for readers to be “a little creative” when it comes to horoscope perception

The stars haven’t aligned for astrologers in the age of COVID-19.

The pandemic has forced some writers and editors to move mountains — or in this case, planets — to have future horoscopes reflect the changing times.

A long-running feature in newspapers and websites, horoscopes can provide a chuckle, some pause for thought, or even eye-rolling among those who don’t believe in forecasts of the future.

Many astrologers clearly didn’t see the pandemic coming, judging by some of the recent suggestions in Canadian online horoscopes.

Hopefully Capricorns didn’t follow advice last Sunday to “get together with people you share history with” or “attend a reunion.”

Scorpios had a challenge on their hands that day — ”Go to a yoga class” seems ambitious given that studios are closed.

And a recommendation for Geminis last weekend? “Network and gather friends together, making helpful introductions” during the day and ”host a gathering” at night.

Not exactly the new normal on the social front as public health authorities suggest people stay home and minimize outdoor activity.

Longtime columnist Eugenia Last said it’s important for readers to be “a little creative” when it comes to horoscope perception.

“Don’t take things so literally,” she said Tuesday. “Look at it and say, ‘How can I make this work for me?’”

Last, a practising astrologer for 30 years, writes syndicated material that appears in a variety of outlets in Canada and across North America. Like most horoscope content, much of her work is written well in advance.

She has been working feverishly with editors to re-word upcoming copy to make it more “useable and friendly” for the times.

Last, whose work frequently appears in the Toronto Sun and on the Canoe.com website, aims to be about two or three months ahead with her content.

She’s able to do that, she said, because she reads from an ephemeris, a book that maps out where all the planets are on any given day.

“Right now, my book goes up to 2050. I could be that far ahead.”

And if the horoscope says ‘get together with your friends,’ it doesn’t mean you can’t do that online, she said.

“You can still socialize. Thank goodness we have social media. It is our connection.”

Those who feel astrology is a load of celestial hogwash were likely tickled to see a recent “Note to Readers” on the subject in the Toronto Star — one of many outlets running slightly outdated horoscopes.

The Star said its horoscope column has included “some suggestions that are contrary to the advice to socially distance or self-quarantine which have been urged by local health agencies, the provincial and Canadian governments.”

The Star said the material was “written a few weeks ago, before these warnings were issued,” adding the column’s tone will soon change to ”reflect the time we find ourselves living in.”

Last said proper interpretation of a horoscope’s suggestions and advice is key.

“Use it for entertainment,” she said. “Take from it what you can. Try to make it or adapt it to what’s going on in our lives right now. If it says, ‘Get out,’ go outside and garden. Be imaginative and find something to do with it.”

Adaptation may prove difficult for Geminis who read Tuesday’s entry from the Astrofame service on MSN’s website.

The horoscope said it was not the ideal day for making plans if you’ve been thinking about a trip.

“Whatever you learn today about airline schedules, hotels, etc., may not reflect the situation as it really is. If you wait a few days, however, things should go far more smoothly.”

Good luck with that.

Gregory Strong, The Canadian Press

CoronavirusHoroscopes

Just Posted

Candice Woloshyn prepares her flower beds for the next season at her ‘Dirty Girl Flowers’ farm in Merville. Despite the pandemic, Woloshyn was able to sustain her homegrown business as community members opted for regular deliveries of fresh cut flowers. Photo by Binny Paul/ Campbell River Mirror.
Vancouver Island flower farmers were blooming as the pandemic wilted everything else

Floriculturists saw increased subscriptions as fresh flowers became a ‘sight for sore eyes’ during isolation

Struggling to afford rent, Sylvia Bailey is hoping to trade her love of cooking for some more affordable accommodation. (Photo courtesy of Sylvia Bailey)
Retired Victoria woman looking to cook, clean or garden in exchange for rent

Sylvia Bailey is hoping to use her love for cooking to help afford rent

View Royal Coun. John Rogers stands next to an unearthed home heating oil tank. As a way to prevent environmental disasters, he is lobbying for a provincial registration system and mandatory inspection for all above-ground tanks, as well as a requirement to remove any underground tanks not used for a prescribed period of time. (Don Descoteau/News Staff)
Efforts to regulate Greater Victoria home heating oil tanks continues

View Royal councillor part of movement to identify old tanks, prevent catastrophic leaks

International Bat Week (Oct. 24-31) is a time for people to learn more about the nocturnal creatures and how to protect them. (Photo by Cory Olson)
Holy Halloween, it’s Bat Week!

Bats have been getting a bad rap — B.C. Bat Program looks to change that

Wind and waves were part of the reason why the Sail Canada High Performance Team selected HMCS Quadra as the winter training base for Tokyo 2021. Photo by Ken Dool
National sailing team prepares for Olympics at Vancouver Island location

Sail Canada picks military facility at 19 Wing Comox for wind, waves and accommodations

Carolyn and Steve Touhey came across a pod of humpback whales while on their boat Sunday, Oct. 25. Photo supplied
VIDEO: Boaters encounter pod of humpbacks in Georgia Strait

Pod spotted between Comox and Texada Island

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau provides an update on the COVID pandemic during a press conference in Ottawa on Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Trudeau says pandemic ‘really sucks,’ and that Christmas gatherings are up in the air

The prime minister encouraged residents to continue to follow the advice of local health authorities

The Williams Lake Indian Band is stipulating no-go zones for mushroom picking in areas burned by last summer’s wildfires. 100 Mile Free Press photo
Who controls mushroom harvesting on Indigenous lands?

‘We don’t necessarily know where the mushrooms grow, how old the stands need to be, those types of things.’

Canadian and American flags fly near the Ambassador Bridge at the Canada/USA border crossing in Windsor, Ont. on Saturday, March 21, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Rob Gurdebeke
U.S. election results one factor that could impact immigration to Canada next year

The survey polled 1,523 Canadians between Oct. 23 and Oct. 25

The voting station mimicked a real voting station in Nicole Choi’s classroom at Chilliwack middle school on Oct. 22, 2020, where students had to show their ID (student cards), be checked off a list, and mark a secret ballot behind a screen. (Jessica Peters/ Chilliwack Progress)
B.C. students choose NDP majority in mock election

More than 90,000 youth took part in school-based election process

Crew transport bus at the Trans Mountain pipeline project work site in Burnaby, March 2020. (Trans Mountain)
Check your workplace COVID-19 safety plans, Dr. Henry urges

Masks in public spaces, distance in lunchrooms for winter

Kelowna City Hall has been vandalized overnight. (Michael Rodriguez - Capital News)
Kelowna City Hall hit by anti-pandemic vandalism

Graffiti condemning the virus appears overnight on City Hall

FILE – A woman smokes a marijuana joint at a “Wake and Bake” legalized marijuana event in Toronto on October 17, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Christopher Katsarov
Home nurse visits could play big role in reducing cannabis use, smoking in young mothers

The program, dubbed the BC Healthy Connections Project, involves public health nursing home visits

Emergency crews respond to an apartment fire on Tuesday, Oct. 20. (PHOTO COURTESY JERRY FEVENS)
Port Alberni RCMP investigate possible arson

Fire was contained but three people displaced in aftermath

Most Read