FILE – Prime Minister Justin Trudeau delivers an official apology to Inuit for the federal government’s management of tuberculosis in the Arctic from the 1940s to the 1960s during an event in Iqaluit, Nunavut on Friday, March 8, 2019. (Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press)

OUR VIEW: Trudeau playing hero on the world stage. Again.

His heroics would be better aimed at home

Justin Trudeau’s largesse abroad with Canadian’s resources is beyond offensive.

Young Canadians can barely afford rent, let alone buy their own home. Homelessness is abundant. Seniors, who helped build this country, are seeing him squander their legacy while they have a hard time making ends meet.

A recent Ipsos poll indicates nearly half of Canadians – 48 per cent of us – are less than $200 away, monthly, from financial insolvency. We are taxed mercilessly, and the stress is showing.

Yet, this prime minister just announced he’ll be handing Canadian steel and wood to France to help rebuild the Notre Dame cathedral in Paris.

If this were a one-off, it could be construed as a noble act. But it is nowhere near a one-off. It’s the latest example of Trudeau’s proclivity toward throwing abroad that which belongs to Canadians.

Three weeks into his job, Trudeau pledged $2.65 billion to help poorer countries combat the effects of climate change. Considering Canada is in debt, that money had to be borrowed before he gave it away.

Fort McMurray burns, and no less than seven countries offer their help. Trudeau’s reply? Thanks, but no thanks.

On a whim, he tweets a $50 million pledge in taxpayer’s money to an American talk show host, to support another international cause called Education Cannot Wait, with the flip comment, “Work for You?”

Did it work for Canadians? Who cares?

Consider the context in which this gift of lumber and steel is being given. France is by no means poor, nor is the Roman Catholic Church. Within a day and a half of the Notre Dame fire, $1 billion USD had already been raised in donations to reconstruct the cathedral.

This cause has help enough, and yet, as per usual, Trudeau would have average Canadians eat cake.

His domestic record is an unworthy shadow of the heroic pose he seeks to strike on the world stage.

Is it any wonder that guys like Donald Trump, with his “America First” mantra, get into power? Undoubtedly because citizens are sick and tired of their heads of state treating them like walking ATMs.

– Black Press

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