Harry Charles Sadd, a 74-year-old former badminton coach, pleaded guilty to eight charges relating to sexual abuse that took place between 1970 and 1984. (RCMP handout)

Victims tell of abuse at hands of Victoria substitute teacher

Harry Charles Sadd pleaded guilty to eight charges that took place between 1970 to 1982

Editor’s Note: This story contains disturbing content.

A sentencing hearing for Harry Charles Sadd, 74, heard that the ex-badminton coach and teacher meets the criteria for pedophilic disorder, according to a psychiatric assessment.

Sadd pleaded guilty to eight charges relating to sexual abuse between the years of 1970 to 1982. A number of his victims, all young boys at the time of the abuse, were in court on Tuesday.

Sadd, whose wife was diabetic and became blind in the early years of their marriage, owned a painting company, in addition to substitute teaching in School Districts 61, 62 and 63.

The court heard how Sadd’s seven victims were between the ages of nine and 13 when the abuse first started, lasting in some cases for years.

RELATED: Former Greater Victoria badminton coach pleads guilty to 8 counts of sexual abuse

R.D., the first victim to come forward, met Sadd when he was nine years old. Sadd began sexually assaulting R.D. when his stepfather died, but the abuse stopped when R.D.’s family moved away for a year. When the family moved back to the Esquimalt area the abuse started again.

Sadd admits there were over 200 instances of sexual abuse after R.D. turned 12.

After R.D. went to police in 2016, a press release was issued asking for more victims to come forward, resulting in 23 new charges, some of which are still pending in the Supreme Court and are expected to be dealt with following this case.

R.D.’s victim impact statement, read out loud by Crown prosecutor Leslie Baskerville, spoke about the pain, stress and strain years of abuse put on his life, along with his wife and children. “Every time I see a Volvo … or smell strong tobacco … every time I watch sports … every time I see a blind person … every time I smell paint [ I’m reminded].”

RELATED: Victoria man charged in historical sexual assaults granted bail

When R.D. would object, Sadd told him to stop “listening to his head and listen to his body,” which was aroused due to Sadd’s touching.

D.C., another young boy abused by Sadd, met him at church and was invited to Sadd’s apartment afterward and introduced him to alcohol. Sadd taught D.C. to drive with him seated on his lap or while he fondled D.C. from the passenger seat. The Sunday afternoon drives, coupled with sexual abuse, became a weekly routine until Sadd moved to Hinton, Alta. to teach full time. Sadd was expelled from the Alberta Teaching Association for allegedly committing sexual offences against three boys. The allegations were dealt with in a tribunal, but not in a court of law.

D.C. read his victim impact statement in court and spoke about the impact the abuse had not only on him, but on his mother who was “devastated and rocked to her core” to learn about the abuse that had been hidden for years. D.C. spoke about the guilt he feels, not having come forward earlier. “How many could have been saved if I had done my part? I’m not to blame but I carry the burden.”

The court heard how the abuse took place in communal showers after badminton practice, on camping trips in shared tents and during overnight tournaments.

The sentencing hearing is expected to continue on Wednesday.



kendra.crighton@blackpress.ca

Follow us on Instagram
Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Housing challenges in Canada complicate efforts to fight COVID-19

Five per cent of all households deemed ‘not suitable’ while other dwellers face other challenges

Mental Health: Fractured services leave community to fill gaps

Greater Victoria service providers working together to help youth

DiManno: Once again, the Queen leads while others let us down

‘Self-discipline, quiet good-humoured resolve and fellow-feeling still characterize this country’

Cowichan Mountie cleared of wrongdoing after woman’s arm broken during arrest

Police were called around 10 p.m. on Dec. 30, 2019 to remove a “severely intoxicated” woman

Duncan using empty streetscape to move forward with public works downtown

Some projects scheduled for later in the year accelerated due to COVID-19 quiet

Truck loses a wheel in crash, keeps going, crashes again in Nanaimo

One person taken to hospital following accident Tuesday afternoon

UPDATE: Canadians awake to extra COVID-19 emergency benefit money, feds clarify changes

The CRA and federal officials are working to clarify the confusion around payments

VIDEO: B.C. singer creates frontline workers tribute song

Cambree Lovesy’s song saluting those battling COVID-19 draws interest online

Statistics Canada report looks at COVID-19’s impact on violence in the family

Police across Canada reported almost 100,000 cases of intimate partner violence in 2018

132,000 B.C. jobs lost just the start of COVID-19 impact, finance minister says

B.C.’s latest employment figures for March show 7.2% increase

B.C. asking companies to contribute through online COVID-19 supply hub

New platform to co-ordinate, source, expedite supplies and equipment to support front-line workers

Controls can keep Canadian COVID-19 deaths under 22,000, health agency says

With poor containment measures, the death toll could be much, much higher, the agency says

People needing addictions services feel ‘abandoned’ during pandemic, B.C.’s ex-top doctor says

Widespread job losses and more homelessness due to physical distancing at shelters have added hurdles

Most Read