Popular Cowichan Lake area elk freed from fence entanglement

Wildlife officers free Mr. Hollywood , warn people to put their stuff away

Popular Cowichan Lake area elk freed from fence entanglement

One of the Cowichan Lake area’s well-known resident elk was rescued from a fence after being entangled for roughly 12 hours.

Wendy Stokes reported that the massive animal eventually was able to free himself from the fence but “the chase was on to get the stuff off his antlers.”

Conservation officer Robin Sano was able to tranquilize and help the elk dubbed “Mr. Hollywood” clear his antlers but the situation has Stokes calling for neighbours and fellow Lakers to remember to check around their yards to see if there are any hazards present, like clotheslines and Christmas lights.

“Every year it happens,” said BC Conservation Services’ South Island Sgt. Scott Norris. “Put your stuff away. If you live in a piece of property where there are elk or deer, there’s a chance an elk is going to get caught up in your stuff.” Norris said the problem with bulls is is they like to wave their big antlers around a lot and they get caught up in people’s things.

“Swing sets, tire swings, hockey nets, fishing nets, tennis nets, hammocks, all sorts of things,” he said. “If an animal’s mobility and ability to feed is severely limited by whatever they’re tangled in then we’ll intervene,” Norris added. “We don’t like to but if it’s severe enough we will.”

Stokes said the conservation officer told her Mr. Hollywood was laying down, letting three different drugs he was administered to facilitate the fence removal from his antlers work their way out of his system Friday afternoon, Dec. 6.

Stokes and others keep a close eye on the resident elk, posting updates about their whereabouts on Valley Fish and Game’s Wilderness Watch page.

Last month another popular resident elk, “Bob”, was freed of rope and possibly a hammock after being found stuck to a tree. Conservation officers also had to help to remove the material from the animal’s antlers that time, too.

“The things they get into,” Stokes said. “One bull elk, this was a while ago, was dragging a tire swing that got tangled in his antlers…no one’s fault but the elk for going through a swing set. I remember a bull with a wind chime on his antler and you could hear him coming. Again, it was his fault for walking into it. But clothesline put up to hang the wet towels up after swimming in the lake etc. and hammocks, they can be put away,” she added.

To view the Valley Fish and Game’s Wilderness Watch page click here

“I have lived here 45 years. Back in the days we had to go to Shaw Creek to see them, now they’re in your yard,” Stokes said. “We have to respect them, we are in their territory. People, they are all over our main road and we need to be aware of them. Especially on Highway 18.”



sarah.simpson@cowichanvalleycitizen.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

 

Popular Cowichan Lake area elk freed from fence entanglement

Popular Cowichan Lake area elk freed from fence entanglement

Conservation officer Robin Sano uses bolt cutters to clear Mr. Hollywood’s antlers of fencing on Friday, Dec. 6. (Wendy Stokes photo)

Conservation officer Robin Sano uses bolt cutters to clear Mr. Hollywood’s antlers of fencing on Friday, Dec. 6. (Wendy Stokes photo)

Just Posted

The Port Alice Community Centre opened its doors to the public Wednesday through Friday morning, offering coffee, tea, hot soup, meals and warmth. Cots were available for overnight stays. The centre had a generator, so people were able to charge their devices. Approximately 75 residents passed through during the three-day outage. (Debra Lynn photo)
Three days in the cold: remote Port Alice survives the power outage

The Port Alice Community Centre opened its doors to the public Wednesday through Friday morning.

Christmas tree file photo
EDITORIAL: An ongoing need for generosity

Food banks need community support throughout the year

A report by investigator Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond found “widespread systemic racism against Indigenous people” in a report released Monday.
Peninsula hospital one where ‘significant work underway’ to repair Indigenous relations

Investigation finds ‘widespread systemic racism against Indigenous people’ in provincial health care

Left to right: A screenshot of NTC nurse navigator Lesley Cerney, FNHA regional mental health manager Georjeana Paterson and Island Health’s medical health officer Dr. Charmaine Enns addressing Ehattesaht community members from Ehatis reserve in a Facebook live update. (Ehattesaht First Nation/Facebook)
Medical team sent to Ehatis reserve near Zeballos to guide community through COVID outbreak

17 cases, eight recoveries and no hospitalizations as Island Health praises First Nation’s response

An man from Errington died when his ATV went over an embankment on Northwest Bay Logging Road on the weekend. (File photo)
Errington man dies in ATV crash southwest of Parksville

Incident happened on Northwest Bay Logging Road on Saturday afternoon

A B.C. Ambulance Service paramedic wearing a face mask to curb the spread of COVID-19 moves a stretcher outside an ambulance at Royal Columbia Hospital, in New Westminster, B.C., on Sunday, November 29, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
B.C. records deadliest weekend of COVID-19 pandemic with 46 deaths; more than 2,300 cases

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry provides COVID-19 update

Fossil finds at Mt. Stephen. (Photo: Sarah Fuller/Parks Canada)
Extreme hiking, time travel and science converge in the Burgess Shale

Climb high in the alpine and trace your family tree back millions of years – to our ocean ancestors

Nanaimo rappers Konfidential and Teus released their first joint album, <em>The Invasion</em>. (Photo courtesy Raymond Knight)
Nanaimo rappers Konfidential and Teus release first joint album

Duo plan elaborate live-streamed CD release for ‘The Invasion’

Kettle bells sit aligned in an indoor fitness studio. (PIxabay.com)
1 COVID-19 case at a B.C. fitness studio leads to 104 more infections, 6 school exposures

According to case data released by Fraser Health, one case of the novel coronavirus carries a big impact

A lightning strike destroyed a radio repeater on Porter Mountain, shutting down the Ministry of Transportation and infrastructure’s highway cam at Sutton Pass. (BC Transportation and Infrastructure photo)
Lightning strike shuts down camera on Tofino-Ucluelet highway

“One of our radio repeater sites was recently struck by lightning.”

Three Ladysmith Health Care Auxiliary Thrift Store volunteers have tested positive for COVID-19. (Ladysmith Health Care Auxiliary photo)
Three Ladysmith Health Care Auxiliary Thrift Store volunteers test positive for COVID-19

Anyone who volunteered at Thrift Store between Nov. 14-Nov. 28 is asked to monitor for symptoms

Vehicles drive past a display thanking essential workers in Burnaby, B.C. on Sunday, Nov. 29, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Marissa Tiel
B.C. changing COVID-19 case reporting as virus spread continues

Manual counting takes more time, leads to errors

Victoria police issued tickets to two Victoria party hosts Saturday night, according to VicPD Chief Del Manak. (Unsplash)
Victoria partiers hid in closets, bedrooms in an attempt to avoid fines

Police gave out COVID-19 tickets to two separate parties

Most Read