The Northern Pulp Nova Scotia Corporation mill is seen in Abercrombie, N.S. on October 11, 2017. An Environment Canada analysis says the federal government’s carbon pricing plan will eliminate as much as 90 million tonnes of carbon dioxide by 2022. That is the equivalent to taking more than 20 million cars off the road and accounts for about 12 per cent of the total amount of what Canada emitted in 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

Ottawa claims price on carbon could cut 90 million tonnes of emissions by 2022

An Environment Canada analysis says the federal government’s carbon pricing plan will eliminate as much as 90 million tonnes of carbon dioxide by 2022.

An Environment Canada analysis says the federal government’s carbon pricing plan could eliminate up to 90 million tonnes of carbon dioxide by 2022.

That’s roughly equivalent to taking more than 20 million cars off the road, and accounts for about 12 per cent of the total amount of what Canada emitted in 2016.

The report marks the first time Ottawa has provided a specific estimate of the impact of its $50-per-tonne carbon price, despite months of demands from the Conservatives that it show what the measure would do to lower emissions.

Related: Canada’s greenhouse gas targets few and far away

Using models of what carbon pricing does to human behaviour and economic growth, the analysis also projects economic growth of about two per cent a year, with or without carbon pricing.

All provinces but Saskatchewan are signatories to the Pan Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change, which requires them to have a minimum $20-per-tonne price on carbon by the start of next year, increasing to $50 by 2022.

Canada also plans regulations to limit methane in the fossil fuel industry, make buildings and homes more efficient, introduce cleaner fuels and electric cars and phasing out coal as a source of electricity.

Even with all of the measures announced so far, Canada will still be about 90 million tonnes shy of its commitment under the Paris agreement.

Related: Climate adaptation needed, B.C. auditor general says

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Dog rescued from bottom of well by Vancouver Island firefighters

Mini the chihuahua mix fell more than 20 feet

UPDATE: Missing Langford teens found safe

Langford pair were headed to Lake Cowichan/Youbou area, last heard from in North Cowichan

Investigation launched after sudden death of Saanich inmate

B.C. Corrections, B.C. Coroners Service investigating cause, circumstances surrounding death

Victoria man dies after skydiving incident in Nanoose Bay

34-year-old had made more than 1,000 jumps

Police use tear gas to apprehend Saanich woman threatening neighbours, police

Woman facing possible criminal charges after standoff with police

Police issue warning after baby comes across suspected drugs in Kamloops park

The 11-month-old girl’s mother posted photos on social media showing a small plastic bag containing a purple substance

Collision results in train derailment just east of Golden

The derailment occurred Sunday night, according to a statement from CP

Lower Mainland woman says llama farming neighbour shot her 11-month-old pup

Young dog was on owner’s Maple Ridge property when it was killed on June 21

B.C. records 31 new cases, six deaths over three days due to COVID-19

There are 166 active cases in B.C., 16 people in hospital

B.C. highway widening job reduced, costs still up $61 million

Union-only project scales back work to widen Trans-Canada

Most Read