A house’s roof covered with a heavy layer of snow. Although not usually a problem on the Saanich Peninsula, this week’s exceptional snowfall has made collapsing roofs a potential issue for homeowners.(Photofunonline.com)

A house’s roof covered with a heavy layer of snow. Although not usually a problem on the Saanich Peninsula, this week’s exceptional snowfall has made collapsing roofs a potential issue for homeowners.(Photofunonline.com)

Meteorologist warns of potential drainage problems and collapsing roofs by end of the week

Warming weather potential rain could create issues with all this snow on the ground

Amid record-breaking February snowfall, Armel Castellan, a meteorologist from Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) has warned of drainage problems and possible roof collapses by the end of the week. Coupled with melting snow, rain is forecast to fall by the end of the week, potentially creating hazards.

“Today is the beginning of the melt. By Valentines Day, we should see temperatures up to as high as 5C and continuing the melt into Friday.” He added, “So there is a possibility of drainage issues, and roof collapses are a concern due to the accumulation of snow on them.”

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Castellan said that meteorologists are unsure of to what extent the snows flurries will turn into rain showers, but estimates there to be more rain than snow.

On any given day in Feb. between 1981-2010, there were 6.3 cm of snow but due to the series of weather events, there will likely to have been 60 cm of snowfall on much of the populated areas of Vancouver Island. The last significant fall was in Feb. 2014, where 39.6 cm fell and the overall record snowfall was on Dec. 29, 1996 at 64.5 cm.

ALSO READ: BC Ferries cancel last round-trips of the day due to expected snowfall

Experts say that although the snowfall has been noteworthy, snow is not as uncommon on the Island as people might think.

“We have always had colder stretches, the difference is our snow events are [usually] quick to wash to slush. This series of weather events have not dislodged the arctic air.”

While there have been significant cold snaps in the past, such as in 1916 and 1923, Castellan strikes a note of caution.

“The climate has changed. How will the [polar] jetstream behave? With the sea-ice melting, there could be more cold arctic air due to a lazier jetstream in future.”

ALSO READ: Twice as much snow fell on Victoria 103 years ago



nick.murray@peninsulanewsreview.com

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