This Nov. 11, 2016 file photo shows the Taylor Glacier near McMurdo Station, Antarctica. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Mark Ralston/Pool Photo via AP, File)

Impact of ice sheet retreat on Canadian weather being underestimated: study

Research suggests disappearance of ice caps will have a major effect on extreme weather in Canada

Newly published research suggests the accelerating disappearance of ice caps in Greenland and Antarctica will have a major and underestimated effect on extreme weather in Canada.

A paper in the journal Nature outlines the most detailed, large-scale study yet on how the melting ice caps will affect people around the world.

It says Central and Eastern Canada will be among the most affected areas and can eventually expect weather variability to almost double.

READ MORE: Experts say glaciers in Western Canada retreat because of climate change

The research predicts hot and cold snaps will get longer and deeper, wet spells will get soggier and dry stretches will get longer.

McGill University scientist Natalya Gomez says the findings aren’t included in current estimates of climate change impacts and the consequences are likely to be more dramatic than expected.

The Canadian Press


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