The Gold River ninja group has been active since May and sends out goodies basket to residents anonymously. (Courtesy of Gold River Ninja group)

The Gold River ninja group has been active since May and sends out goodies basket to residents anonymously. (Courtesy of Gold River Ninja group)

Vancouver Island cops get ‘ninja’d’ and they are ‘touched’ by the gesture

Nootka Sound RCMP in Gold River received a goody basket anonymously even as cops elsewhere are under scanner for police brutality

The Nootka Sound RCMP office in Gold River opened its doors last week to find a goody basket filled with sweets and treats for the officer’s dogs.

Along with it was a note that said, “you have been ninja’d.”

“I wasn’t aware of the ninja concept at first,” said Cpl. Kim Rutherford whose colleagues found the surprise package left on a bench outside the back door.

Bordering loosely on the concept of a year-round Secret Santa, ninja groups became popular in B.C. after people started receiving anonymous packages filled with goodies during the pandemic.

People shared their pictures, wish-lists, address and details on local Facebook ninja groups and they stealthily received packages that contained the items they wished for.

Gold River, too, has an active all-women’s Facebook ninja group. Started by sisters Sandy and Christina Sinclair in May, the group has over 100 residents who keep the activities rolling.

According to Rutherford, the “little basket” the RCMP received was encouraging for the officers especially at a time when stories and videos of police brutality are circulating all over the Internet.

RELATED: Kelowna RCMP release statement after civil suit filed over alleged rough arrest

“I was so touched, especially in light of all the stuff that’s going on in the world, that people took the time to reach out and let us know that they appreciate us,” said Rutherford.

According to Rutherford, “most Canadians recognize and have had a positive experience with police officers.”

“Unfortunately, our jobs entail that we get called when people are in crisis and maybe not feeling their best. Do we always respond 100 per cent perfectly? No, because we are human.”

But despite unfortunate instances that have been highlighted in the media of late, Rutherford also said that out of the “millions of calls and interactions” that are done every day, the “majority” are positive and the majority of police officers are maintaining their professionalism and their compassion.

“When they don’t and it is captured on video, it shows a very unsatisfactory human side of it that none of us are proud of and none of us endorse.”

Cpl. Kim Rutherford shared a picture of what’s remaining in the basket that was sent by the ninjas to the Nootka Sound RCMP

In the past, Nootka Sound RCMP division has often received flowers, cards and birthday cakes from community members, but this is the first time that an anonymous appreciation token came through.

“We have so many kind people in the community that it could be anyone.”

And even though Rutherford did some light investigation to find out who sent the basket, she still does not know who these ninjas are.

“The investigator in me wants to find out, and I’ll keep my ear to the ground,” said Rutherford, but added jokingly that she won’t be “fingerprinting anyone.”

READ ALSO: Ninja groups could be setting children up for identity theft, online safety expert says

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