Volunteers meet each Sunday in October at the Cattle Point kiosk to wage war against invasive plants. (Black Press Media file photo)

Volunteers meet each Sunday in October at the Cattle Point kiosk to wage war against invasive plants. (Black Press Media file photo)

No Ivy League tackles invasives in Oak Bay park with sensitive Garry oak ecosystem

Volunteers needed to battle English ivy and Daphne laurel

Invasive plants thrive in the same growing conditions as the rare plants in Uplands Park, which is why volunteers swarm it several times a year to tackle the intruders.

Each fall the Friends of Uplands Park hosts the No Ivy League, equipping volunteers to remove English ivy and Daphne laurel from the 32-hectare Oak Bay park that includes a sensitive Garry oak ecosystem and Cattle Point. The extremely invasive ivy strangles trees and forms a complex, dense carpet that stops flowers from growing and animals from finding food.

Uplands Park plays a key role in protecting natural heritage and biodiversity.

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Boasting one of the highest concentrations of rare and endangered plants in Canada, the park contains the remnants of a rare ecosystem of complex Garry oak meadows and woodlands, maritime meadows and vernal pools, which used to cover a much greater area in the region.

The team meets each Sunday this month from 1 to 3 p.m. with volunteer hours helping remove the invasive as well as bolstering grant funding.

Tools and gloves are provided as are refreshments. Volunteers can meet at the kiosk at Cattle Point.

READ ALSO: Damage unleashed on sensitive Oak Bay park as dog popularity rises

christine.vanreeuwyk

@blackpress.ca

oak bay