The Trail Times’ Michelle Bedford took these incredible photos of a robin’s eggs hatching in her Genelle backyard nest. It’s her third clutch of eggs this summer as the American robin begins to breed shortly after returning to its summer range. It is one of the first North American bird species to lay eggs, and normally has two to three broods per breeding season, which lasts from April to July.

BC SPCA explains how to handle a baby bird found out of its nest

Wild ARC advises to call the centre and not feed birds

Spring has arrived and so have many different animals including birds, who are beginning their nesting season.

Birds will be busy carrying their young from March through July and there may be many situations where the hatchlings are found on the ground instead of inside their nests.

BC SPCA Wild Animal Rehabilitation Centre (Wild ARC) manager Andrea Wallace suggests that if anyone comes across a bird that seems out of place, to give them a call.

READ MORE: Wild ARC invites 1,000 community members to tour its facility

Wallace said sometimes, birds that have just left their nests for the first time can seem like they don’t belong but are actually just learning how to get about in the world.

“If the bird is very young and doesn’t have any feathers then it’s too early for it to be out of the nest,” Wallace said. “When they grow up a little and they’re first leaving the nest they look quite awkward… because they don’t know how to fly and they’re fumbling around on the ground but that’s actually quite normal so it just sort of depends on what stage that bird is at in its life.”

Wallace also said to try and keep dogs and cats away from nests during breeding season. She said if possible, to keep cats indoors as well so they’re not raiding nests.

“Cats can cause a lot of problems for these little birds that don’t quite know how to fly yet,” Wallace said.

READ MORE: Keep hummingbird feeders filled over winter, says Wild ARC

If a bird is out of its nest and shouldn’t be, Wallace said the best course of action is to put on a pair of garden gloves, cover the bird with a piece of fabric and place it back in its nest.

She said because humans are considered to be giant predators, covering the bird so it can’t see what’s going on can help it calm down.

Wallace also strongly advises to not feed the birds. She said wildlife have specialized diets and the Wild ARC facility puts time and effort into determining what diet is for each of species.

“It’s not something humans can replicate so I’d advise not to feed them,” Wallace said.

shalu.mehta@goldstreamgazette.com


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Child hit and killed in driveway in Cobble Hill

The driver of the vehicle remained at the crash scene and is fully cooperating

Campers hailed heroes in rock face rescue at Cowichan Provincial Park

The campers quickly noticed the man in distress and jumped into the river to swim across.

Mid-Island tracking toward driest June on record

Predictions for rain this week could bring temporary relief

Overpass, barrier, more parking considered for Cathedral Grove

Provincial government proceeding ‘with caution’

‘Danger Cat’ in medically-induced coma after serious dirt bike incident

GoFundMe campaign raised more than $3,000 for Campbell River man by Monday afternoon

VIDEO: Killer whale steals fisherman’s catch off North Coast

Fishing duel results in eager orca snagging salmon in Prince Rupert

Home gutted in fire deemed ‘suspicious’ by authorities in Campbell River

No injuries reported; firefighters prevented blaze from spreading

Team effort rescues injured mountain biker in Cumberland

Comox Valley Ground Search and Rescue, the Cumberland Fire Department and BC… Continue reading

West Shore RCMP bust drug lab after fire caused by production of cannabis shatter

View Royal lab near parks and children’s playgrounds, evidence of children in home

Island Health issues safer drug-use tips ahead of music festival season

Health authority aims to reduce overdose risks at festivals

Man appealing conviction for drive-by shooting attempt in Nanaimo

Armaan Singh Chandi was sentenced to nine years in jail in B.C. Supreme Court last month

Sailing cancellations as Baynes Sound Connector set to undergo maintenance

Denman Island ferry out of service Wednesday night

Eating sandwiches, putting on makeup behind the wheel could land you a fine

RCMP say if you cause an accident while eating you could be penalized

Cat badly hurt in animal trap was likely stuck for days, B.C. owner says

Blu, a three-year-old house cat, suffered severe damage to his hind leg after being stuck in trap for days

Most Read