Truth and Reconciliation

Tk’emlups te Secwepemc Kukpi7 (Chief) Rosanne Casimir speaks during a news conference ahead of a ceremony to honour residential school survivors and mark the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, in Kamloops, BC., on Thursday, September 30, 2021. The remains of 215 children were discovered buried near the former Kamloops Indian Residential School earlier this year. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Indigenous leaders call for ‘concrete action’ on first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation

215 unmarked graves of missing children were found on the grounds of the Kamloops residential school

Tk’emlups te Secwepemc Kukpi7 (Chief) Rosanne Casimir speaks during a news conference ahead of a ceremony to honour residential school survivors and mark the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, in Kamloops, BC., on Thursday, September 30, 2021. The remains of 215 children were discovered buried near the former Kamloops Indian Residential School earlier this year. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Nanaimo Indian Hospital survivor Melven <ins>(Sx̄wen)</ins> Jones recounts the abuse he endured at six years old, as he sits outside his home in Victoria. (Arnold Lim/Black Press Media)

‘It has to be heard’: Nanaimo Indian Hospital survivor recounts torture he endured

Melven (Sx̄wen) Jones was forcibly held for two years

Nanaimo Indian Hospital survivor Melven <ins>(Sx̄wen)</ins> Jones recounts the abuse he endured at six years old, as he sits outside his home in Victoria. (Arnold Lim/Black Press Media)
The For the Children Caravan, made up of members of the Syilx Okanagan Nation Alliance’s constituent First Nations, including the Lower Similkameen Indian Band, departed from Penticton on June 30 to head to the site of the Kamloops Residential School where 215 children’s bodies were uncovered. (Brennan Phillips - Western News)

‘Truth and Reconciliation is an action, not a day off’: Lower Similkameen Indian Band Chief

Many left wondering over new statutory Truth and Reconciliation Day, says Chief Keith Crow

The For the Children Caravan, made up of members of the Syilx Okanagan Nation Alliance’s constituent First Nations, including the Lower Similkameen Indian Band, departed from Penticton on June 30 to head to the site of the Kamloops Residential School where 215 children’s bodies were uncovered. (Brennan Phillips - Western News)
Shoes are placed on the lawn outside the former Kamloops Indian Residential School to honour 215 children after it was announced that ground-penetrating radar had detected unmarked graves near the facility in Kamloops, B.C., on June 4, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Canada marks first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation

Numerous Indigenous nations reported unmarked graves at former residential school sites

Shoes are placed on the lawn outside the former Kamloops Indian Residential School to honour 215 children after it was announced that ground-penetrating radar had detected unmarked graves near the facility in Kamloops, B.C., on June 4, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Victoria’s Orange Shirt Day founders Eddy Charlie (left) and Kristin Spray (right) stand on the steps of the B.C. legislature. (Arnold Lim/Black Press)

Victoria’s Orange Shirt Day is born out of trauma, friendship and hope

‘There’s room in the circle for everyone’: Sept. 30 invites reconciliation

Victoria’s Orange Shirt Day founders Eddy Charlie (left) and Kristin Spray (right) stand on the steps of the B.C. legislature. (Arnold Lim/Black Press)
J,SINTEN John Elliott, here seen speaking at the Indigenous language conference HELISET TTE SKAL – ‘Let the Languages Live,’ in 2019 says local First Nations languages are deeply connected to the surrounding land. (Photo courtesy of the First Peoples’ Cultural Foundation)

Saanich Peninsula resident John Elliott is a leading voice in revitalizing language, culture

Locals working hard to ensure first languages are not lost forever

J,SINTEN John Elliott, here seen speaking at the Indigenous language conference HELISET TTE SKAL – ‘Let the Languages Live,’ in 2019 says local First Nations languages are deeply connected to the surrounding land. (Photo courtesy of the First Peoples’ Cultural Foundation)
Steve Sxwithul'txw in his home in Cook Street Village, standing beside a print of his independent production company – Kwassen Productions - logo. (Kiernan Green/News Staff)
Steve Sxwithul'txw in his home in Cook Street Village, standing beside a print of his independent production company – Kwassen Productions - logo. (Kiernan Green/News Staff)
A survivor of the Alberni residential school, Kathleen Horne, left, and her husband Doug LaFortune stand outside the First Peoples House at the University of Victoria. 
(Jake Romphf/News Staff)

Tsawout residential school survivor no longer afraid to share her story

‘We, as the survivors, can tell the stories for the ones who didn’t get to go home’

A survivor of the Alberni residential school, Kathleen Horne, left, and her husband Doug LaFortune stand outside the First Peoples House at the University of Victoria. 
(Jake Romphf/News Staff)
Kendra Gage, executive director of Hulitan Family and Community Services Society, at the society’s Langford location. (Jake Romphf/News Staff)
Kendra Gage, executive director of Hulitan Family and Community Services Society, at the society’s Langford location. (Jake Romphf/News Staff)
A woman places one of 215 pairs of children’s shoes on the steps of the Vancouver Art Gallery as a memorial to the 215 children whose remains have been found buried at the site of a former residential school in Kamloops, in Vancouver, B.C., Friday, May 28, 2021. When the Tk’emlúps te Secwe̓pemc Nation announced the discovery of 215 unmarked graves found at the site of a former residential school in Kamloops, B.C., Canadians had to face the horrific realities Indigenous children and youth had to live while being forced to attend residential schools. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Teaching Canadians to observe solemn new Truth and Reconciliation Day could take time

The holiday grants a paid day off to federally regulated employees and public servants

A woman places one of 215 pairs of children’s shoes on the steps of the Vancouver Art Gallery as a memorial to the 215 children whose remains have been found buried at the site of a former residential school in Kamloops, in Vancouver, B.C., Friday, May 28, 2021. When the Tk’emlúps te Secwe̓pemc Nation announced the discovery of 215 unmarked graves found at the site of a former residential school in Kamloops, B.C., Canadians had to face the horrific realities Indigenous children and youth had to live while being forced to attend residential schools. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Riders stage before embarking on the shared ride between Homalco First Nation and the River City Cycling Club. Photo by Sean Feagan / Campbell River Mirror.

VIDEO: Homalco shares ride with cycling club on Truth and Reconciliation Day

Homalco bike program helping people process trauma and connecting communities

Riders stage before embarking on the shared ride between Homalco First Nation and the River City Cycling Club. Photo by Sean Feagan / Campbell River Mirror.
Nanaimo Indian Hospital survivor Melven <ins>(Sx̄wen)</ins> Jones recounts the abuse he endured at six years old, as he sits outside his home in Victoria. (Arnold Lim/Black Press Media)

‘It has to be heard’: Greater Victoria survivor recounts torture he endured at Indian Hospital

Melven (Sx̄wen) Jones was forcibly held at the Nanaimo Indian Hospital for two years

Nanaimo Indian Hospital survivor Melven <ins>(Sx̄wen)</ins> Jones recounts the abuse he endured at six years old, as he sits outside his home in Victoria. (Arnold Lim/Black Press Media)
The WSANEC Leadership Council wants to help non-Indigenous residents understand more about the traditional territories, language and history of First Nations in the area. (Photo courtesy of the WSANEC Leadership Council/Twitter)

WSANEC settler education page offers resources on Indigenous territories, language

Territory acknowledgments, history lessons offered to help reconciliation efforts

The WSANEC Leadership Council wants to help non-Indigenous residents understand more about the traditional territories, language and history of First Nations in the area. (Photo courtesy of the WSANEC Leadership Council/Twitter)