landslide

A slow moving landslide is seen inching down a hillside in northern British Columbia, prompting the evacuation of nearby Old Fort, B.C., in an undated handout photo. Residents of a tiny community in northern British Columbia are suing the local and provincial governments over two slow-moving landslides that they say caused their property values to plummet. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-B.C. Ministry of Forests and Lands, Marten Geertsema, *MANDATORY CREDIT*

Residents of Old Fort, B.C., suing province, others over slow-moving slide

Residents in Old Fort., B.C., allege negligence and breach of their charter right to security of the person

 

An aerial shot of the landslide, captured by 49 North Helicopter pilot Bastian Fleury. Photo 49 North Helicopters/Facebook

VIDEO: 100-metre wave causes massive washout in Bute Inlet

Landslide causes wave in glacial lake, washes out river on B.C. Central Coast

 

Old Fort Road during a landslide, June 21, 2020. (BC Transportation)

Creeping slide prompts evacuation alert, road closure in Old Fort, B.C.

Second time in two years the road has closed

 

A top down view of the fish ladder constructed to help fish into the Whooshh Passage Portal. (Fisheries and Oceans Canada photo)

High tech fish transport system set up to ‘whoosh’ salmon past Big Bar landslide

Fish will spend roughly 20 seconds inside the system, moving at roughly 20 metres per second

A top down view of the fish ladder constructed to help fish into the Whooshh Passage Portal. (Fisheries and Oceans Canada photo)
Fish ladder using nearly 500 concrete blocks under construction April 9, 2020, leading to pond and pumping station to lift salmon over the obstacle created by the June 2019 Big Bar landslide in the Fraser Canyon. (Fisheries and Oceans Canada)

Feds to move salmon over Big Bar landslide with fish cannon along Fraser River

Water levels rising now after months of drilling and blasting at the Big Bar site north of Lillooet

Fish ladder using nearly 500 concrete blocks under construction April 9, 2020, leading to pond and pumping station to lift salmon over the obstacle created by the June 2019 Big Bar landslide in the Fraser Canyon. (Fisheries and Oceans Canada)
The East Toe is a outcropping of rock in the Fraser River at the Big Bar Landslide site, northwest of Kamloops that has to be removed to restore fish passage. (Fisheries and Oceans Canada)

Long-awaited blasting advances efforts to clear Big Bar blockage

Pressure has been on senior governments working with First Nations to remove rock at slide site

The East Toe is a outcropping of rock in the Fraser River at the Big Bar Landslide site, northwest of Kamloops that has to be removed to restore fish passage. (Fisheries and Oceans Canada)
A convoy of vehicles leaves Hemlock Valley Road on Feb. 3, 2020, escorted by an Emil Anderson Maintenance vehicle.(Emil Anderson Maintenance/Contributed)

B.C. family recounts escape after landslide strands them on Sasquatch Mountain

Christine Nielsen, her husband and two kids drove up only a couple of hours before the road washout

A convoy of vehicles leaves Hemlock Valley Road on Feb. 3, 2020, escorted by an Emil Anderson Maintenance vehicle.(Emil Anderson Maintenance/Contributed)