Health and wellness

FILE - This 1997 image provided by U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows the right arm and torso of a patient, whose skin displayed a number of lesions due to what had been an active case of monkeypox. As health authorities in Europe and elsewhere roll out vaccines and drugs to stamp out the biggest monkeypox outbreak beyond Africa, in 2022, some doctors are acknowledging an ugly reality: The resources to slow the disease’s spread have long been available, just not to the Africans who have dealt with it for decades. (CDC via AP, File)

WHO panel: Monkeypox not a global emergency ‘at this stage’

An “intense” response to control its spread is necessary however, the panel said

 

Group of members of the B.C. Professional Fire Fighters’, B.C. Children’s Hospital staff, and the McKenzies’ a patient family joining together in front of the hospital (June 14). Provided by B.C. Children’s Hospital.

VIDEO: B.C. firefighters donate $1M for child burn survivors

$1 million from the B.C. Professional Fire Fighter’s Association improves child burn care treatment

 

UBC is set to start construction on a $139.4 million biomedical engineering facility this summer. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

New ‘state-of-the-art’ UBC building aims to boost B.C. healthcare, biotech sectors

A UBC biomedical engineering facility will break ground this summer thanks to a provincial grant

 

Farmers market berries. Photo retrieved from pixabay.com.

Disease prevention starts in the grocery store grabbing nutritional items

Disease prevention starts in the grocery store, says Sandra Gentleman, registered dietitian.

Farmers market berries. Photo retrieved from pixabay.com.
The BC Schizophrenia Society supported more than 1,000 families touched by serious mental illness in 2021. (BC Schizophrenia Society/Facebook)

BC Schizophrenia Society hopes to reach thousands touched by serious mental illness

Non-profit offers resources, peer and group support for those with illness and their loved ones

The BC Schizophrenia Society supported more than 1,000 families touched by serious mental illness in 2021. (BC Schizophrenia Society/Facebook)
A man pauses at a coffin after carrying it during a memorial march to remember victims of overdose deaths in Vancouver on August 15, 2020. Advocates say Health Canada’s announcement to decriminalize personal possession of 2.5 grams will do little to save people’s lives. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

For decriminalization to save lives, users need to be allowed to carry more drugs: B.C. advocates

Health Canada nearly halved requested personal possession amount in approval May 31

A man pauses at a coffin after carrying it during a memorial march to remember victims of overdose deaths in Vancouver on August 15, 2020. Advocates say Health Canada’s announcement to decriminalize personal possession of 2.5 grams will do little to save people’s lives. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Dean Anderson holds up a sign before a march on the first National Day of Action to draw attention to the opioid overdose epidemic, in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, on February 21, 2017. Beginning Jan. 31 2023, adults in B.C. will be allowed to carry up to 2.5 grams of drugs for personal use, Health Canada announced May 31, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

B.C. approved to decriminalize possession of small amounts of street drugs as deaths soar

Personal possession of up to 2.5 grams to be allowed for three years beginning Jan. 31, 2023

Dean Anderson holds up a sign before a march on the first National Day of Action to draw attention to the opioid overdose epidemic, in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, on February 21, 2017. Beginning Jan. 31 2023, adults in B.C. will be allowed to carry up to 2.5 grams of drugs for personal use, Health Canada announced May 31, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
This March 2002 file photo shows a deer tick under a microscope in the entomology lab at the University of Rhode Island in South Kingstown, R.I. Lyme disease has settled so deeply into parts of Canada many public health units now just assume if you get bitten by a tick, you should be treated for lyme disease. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP/Victoria Arocho

Online map tracks B.C.’s high-risk Lyme disease zones

About 1 in 100 ticks carry Lyme disease in B.C.

This March 2002 file photo shows a deer tick under a microscope in the entomology lab at the University of Rhode Island in South Kingstown, R.I. Lyme disease has settled so deeply into parts of Canada many public health units now just assume if you get bitten by a tick, you should be treated for lyme disease. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP/Victoria Arocho
The makers of Jif peanut butter are recalling some of its products due to potential salmonella contamination. (Courtesy of Canadian Food Inspection Agency)

Some Jif peanut butter products recalled due to potential salmonella contamination

Jars with lot codes 1274425 through 2140425 should be disposed of immediately

The makers of Jif peanut butter are recalling some of its products due to potential salmonella contamination. (Courtesy of Canadian Food Inspection Agency)
Kara Nystrom, a contender for Miss Health and Fitness 2022, is possibly the first transgender woman to enter in the U.S. magazine contest. (Kiernan Green/News Staff)

‘A queer, feminine body against the world:’ A Victoria woman’s vision for Miss Health and Fitness

Kara Nystrom has entered a U.S. magazine contest that is soon open to voting

Kara Nystrom, a contender for Miss Health and Fitness 2022, is possibly the first transgender woman to enter in the U.S. magazine contest. (Kiernan Green/News Staff)
Members of the Victoria Police Department are receiving trauma resiliency training, thanks to a program developed at the University of Victoria. (Black Press Media file photo)

Trauma training kickoff for Victoria police coincides with Wounded Warrior Run

Resiliency training offers knowledge, tools to mitigate effect of traumatic experiences

Members of the Victoria Police Department are receiving trauma resiliency training, thanks to a program developed at the University of Victoria. (Black Press Media file photo)
Valentine’s Day may be over, but all of February is Heart Month. (Stock photo)

Too many Canadians suffering from heart failure, report finds

Heart and Stroke Foundation report suggests testing, treatment, support

Valentine’s Day may be over, but all of February is Heart Month. (Stock photo)
Study participants with better attitudes toward aging showed a 43 per cent reduced risk of all-cause mortality. (Metro Creative Graphics photo)

A positive outlook on getting old could help with aging, B.C. study says

Study author says negative attitudes toward aging could become a self-fulfilling prophecy

Study participants with better attitudes toward aging showed a 43 per cent reduced risk of all-cause mortality. (Metro Creative Graphics photo)
Members of the Parkinson Wellness Project take part in an exercise class, weeks before the centre’s closure in 2020 due to the pandemic. (Black Press Media file photo)

Parkinson Wellness Project bringing unparalleled care back to Victoria

Therapeutic fitness sessions, educational opportunities make a ‘significant difference’ for clients

Members of the Parkinson Wellness Project take part in an exercise class, weeks before the centre’s closure in 2020 due to the pandemic. (Black Press Media file photo)
Ami Salmen says her tattoos have helped her to accept her new body, and keep loving herself throughout her breast cancer journey. (Photo by Lexy Parks, courtesy of Ami Salmen)

Power of ink: How tattoos helped a B.C. woman through her breast cancer journey

Ami Salmen’s tattoos helped her throughout her breast cancer journey. She’s now in the running to be on the cover of Inked Magazine

Ami Salmen says her tattoos have helped her to accept her new body, and keep loving herself throughout her breast cancer journey. (Photo by Lexy Parks, courtesy of Ami Salmen)
Ryan Rhodes is a University of Victoria professor and expert in exercise science, studying the psychology behind healthy behaviours. He offers tips to remain on board with resolutions through sustainable practice. (Photo courtesy of the University of Victoria)

New year’s resolutions are cliche – adopting healthy habits takes time, UVic expert says

Try pairing something you enjoy with health changes that might initially feel like a burden

Ryan Rhodes is a University of Victoria professor and expert in exercise science, studying the psychology behind healthy behaviours. He offers tips to remain on board with resolutions through sustainable practice. (Photo courtesy of the University of Victoria)
Signs say ‘Mental Health Matters,’ ‘Gyms are Essential,’ and ‘#FreeBC’ (Iron Energy Gym Instagram)

West Kelowna gym ordered to close and fined $2,300 for disobeying COVID restrictions

Interior Health was escorted by RCMP at Iron Energy Gym

Signs say ‘Mental Health Matters,’ ‘Gyms are Essential,’ and ‘#FreeBC’ (Iron Energy Gym Instagram)
Coldwater swimming is becoming a popular practice as many find that it benefits their state of mind. (Megan Atkins-Baker/News Staff)

VIDEO: Polar bear dippers tout benefits of cold water swimming this winter solstice at Mile 0

A winter solstice swim and dance party brought together over 80 people safely outdoors

Coldwater swimming is becoming a popular practice as many find that it benefits their state of mind. (Megan Atkins-Baker/News Staff)
Saanich resident Kim Dickinson and her son, Gavin Dickinson-Sichello, mug for a selfie. Gavin was recently diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, and he and his family are doing their best to adjust to their new lifestyle. (Photo courtesy Kim Dickinson)

Saanich family embracing lifestyle change after Type 1 diabetes diagnosis

Kim Dickinson says son Gavin, 10, gaining independence, learning to recognize warning signs

Saanich resident Kim Dickinson and her son, Gavin Dickinson-Sichello, mug for a selfie. Gavin was recently diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, and he and his family are doing their best to adjust to their new lifestyle. (Photo courtesy Kim Dickinson)
Sara Maksymowicz worries about the effect of cuts to non-emergency care on the South Island for adults facing eating disorders. (Courtesy Sara Maksymowicz)

‘A system of failures:’ South Vancouver Island adult eating disorder services quietly removed

Non-emergency resources have been a lifeline for Greater Victoria residents

Sara Maksymowicz worries about the effect of cuts to non-emergency care on the South Island for adults facing eating disorders. (Courtesy Sara Maksymowicz)