Astronomy

Cam Wipper, an astronomer with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, will talk about how his career took him from Vancouver Island to the big island of Hawaii at Nanaimo Astronomy Society’s upcoming monthly meeting. (Photo submitted)

Astronomer from Nanaimo part of exciting discoveries at Hawaii observatories

Cam Wipper will share stories from his professional career at next Nanaimo Astronomy Society meeting

 

In this Sunday, Dec. 13, 2020 photo made available by NASA, Saturn, top, and Jupiter, below, are seen after sunset from Shenandoah National Park in Luray, Va. The two planets are drawing closer to each other in the sky as they head towards a “great conjunction” on Monday, Dec. 21, where the two giant planets will appear a tenth of a degree apart. (Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP)

Jupiter and Saturn align in our skies tonight, to form the Great Conjunction

Stargazers typically gather in groups at observatories or with backyard telescopes for such events

  • Dec 21, 2020

 

Mars will appear orange and distinct in the night sky this month. (Damian Peach photo)

Mars jumps out from the night sky across B.C.

Mars is the brightest it’s been in 15 years this October

 

The Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope on Mauna Kea. (Stock photo)

Vancouver Island’s Hawaii telescope operator will trace his path in astronomy

Cam Wipper to be featured Friday, Aug. 28, in Royal Astronomical Society of Canada webinar

The Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope on Mauna Kea. (Stock photo)
This image of Comet NEOWISE, taken near Pipers Lagoon Park by Tony Puerzer, Nanaimo Astronomy Society vice-president, illustrates the quality that can be achieved with basic photographic equipment. The image was shot with a 50 millimetre, f/1.4 lens on a Canon digital camera for an exposure time of six seconds, at a sensitivity setting of 1600 ISO, Puerzer’s recommended recipe for imaging the comet with minimal equipment. (Tony Puerzer photo)

Vancouver Island skywatcher offers tips on how to capture Comet NEOWISE

Fancy equipment not needed to photograph comet on 6,800-year orbital journey, says society VP

This image of Comet NEOWISE, taken near Pipers Lagoon Park by Tony Puerzer, Nanaimo Astronomy Society vice-president, illustrates the quality that can be achieved with basic photographic equipment. The image was shot with a 50 millimetre, f/1.4 lens on a Canon digital camera for an exposure time of six seconds, at a sensitivity setting of 1600 ISO, Puerzer’s recommended recipe for imaging the comet with minimal equipment. (Tony Puerzer photo)