A football with the new CFL logo sits on a chair in Winnipeg, Friday, November 27, 2015. An MP with a long history with the CFL is hoping the league has called an audible in its approach to securing financial help from the federal government. Liberal MP Bob Bratina, who spent 20 years doing play-by-play on Hamilton Tiger-Cats and Toronto Argonauts radio broadcasts before entering politics, is questioning the CFL’s strategy. THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods

A football with the new CFL logo sits on a chair in Winnipeg, Friday, November 27, 2015. An MP with a long history with the CFL is hoping the league has called an audible in its approach to securing financial help from the federal government. Liberal MP Bob Bratina, who spent 20 years doing play-by-play on Hamilton Tiger-Cats and Toronto Argonauts radio broadcasts before entering politics, is questioning the CFL’s strategy. THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods

CFL commissioner Randy Ambrosie lays out best-case scenario for 2020 season

Ambrosie also stated a cancelled 2020 season remains a possibility due to the COVID-19 pandemic

Commissioner Randy Ambrosie says the earliest the CFL can start the 2020 season is September, and there won’t be a “traditional” Grey Cup in Regina.

Ambrosie made the statement Wednesday during a virtual video conference with season-ticket holders.

Ambrosie also stated a cancelled 2020 season remains a possibility due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Please note that we are not announcing or promising a return this fall,” he said. “We are just letting our fans know this remains one of the remaining possible scenarios for 2020.

“A cancelled season is also possible. Again, it’s too soon to make a sure call at this point.”

The prospect of the CFL starting the season in September isn’t new as Ambrosie told The Canadian Press in April, “there’s a lot pointing to September as being a reasonable person’s view of when we might be able to resume.”

READ MORE: Trudeau: Discussions ongoing with CFL as league seeks government assistance

Last month, the CFL postponed the start of training camps — which were to open last week — and pushed back the June 11 start of the regular season to July, at the earliest.

Ambrosie also called upon the Canadian government for financial assistance.

The league asked for $30 million immediately, additional monies if the ‘20 season began late and up to $120 million for the worst-case scenario — the cancellation of the entire campaign.

The CFL is also changing its ‘20 Grey Cup plans.

Regina was scheduled to host this year’s game but instead has been awarded the 2022 contest.

Hamilton will remain as the 2021 Grey Cup host.

If there’s an abbreviated 2020 season, the Grey Cup finalist with the best regular-season record will host the CFL championship game. The contest could still be played in Regina if the Saskatchewan Roughriders were one of the finalists and the team with the better record.

“The pandemic has had a drastic effect on travel, tourism and the economy,” Ambrosie said. ”It has become increasingly clear we will not be able to host a traditional Grey Cup and Grey Cup Festival, certainly not with the size and scope that has become customary.”

And if the CFL does hit the field starting in September, it will mean the cancellation of the Touchdown Atlantic game slated for June 25 in Halifax between the Toronto Argonauts and Saskatchewan Roughriders at Huskies Stadium on the campus of Saint Mary’s University.

“The only thing deeper than our regret is our resolve to return to Atlantic Canada,” Ambrosie said. “It pains us that this pandemic is preventing us from showing our friends in Nova Scotia, in person, just how saddened we are by the senseless tragedy they have been forced to bear, and how much we admire their strength.”

Dan Ralph, The Canadian Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Want to support local journalism during the pandemic? Make a donation here.

CFLCoronavirus

Just Posted

Mona Strelaeff, a Metchosin resident, is the first non-terminally ill person in Canada to be allowed to use psilocybin assisted therapy. (Provided by Spencer Hawkswell)
Island woman’s magic mushroom trauma treatment could be trendsetting

Experts say this could signal the broadening of who can access psilocybin therapy

Grade 3 student Nate Twaddle, who uses a walker for a rare neurological condition, has been zooming along a new accessible walkway since it was installed in early October at Willway Elementary in Langford. (Aaron Guillen/News Staff)
Langford mother thankful for accessible walkway that helps son connect with peers

Rare neurological condition means Grade 3 student uses wheelchair, walker to play

Trevor Davis, base manager of the Western Canada Marine Response Corporation in Sidney, stands in front of the Hecate Sentinal, an oil skimming vessel based at Sidney’s Van Isle Marina. (Wolf Depner/News Staff)
Oil spill response base taking shape on Saanich Peninsula

Enhanced base with elements in North Saanich and Sidney to be fully operational in fall 2022

The Fraser Institute’s annual report card on B.C. elementary schools ranks schools across the province based on standardized tests. (Black Press Media file photo)
Opinion: Fraser Institute delivers elementary schools the usual mixed report card

What we learn doesn’t change, but maybe how we react to it should

Victoria’s Royal Jubilee Hospital took in two COVID-19 patients from Northern Health as part of a provincial agreement. (Black Press Media file photo)
Victoria hospital takes in two COVID-19 patients from Northern Health

Royal Jubilee Hospital takes patients as part of provincial transport network

Janet Austin, the lieutenant-governor of British Columbia, not seen, swears in Premier John Horgan during a virtual swearing in ceremony in Victoria, Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020. Horgan says he will look to fill gaps in the federal government’s sick-pay benefits program aimed at preventing the spread of COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
B.C. premier says province prepared to patch holes in new federal sick-pay benefits

Horgan said workers should not be denied pay when they are preventing COVID-19’s spread

Higher sales of cannabis helped Canadian farmers come out in the green. (Black Press Media File)
Higher cannabis sales grew the income of Canadian farmers

Higher cannabis receipts added $1.7 billion to the revenue of farmers

Trinity Kettyls and Mackenzie Rigg start their 5.4km loop in Gordon Head on Sunday cheered on by members of the Vikes soccer team. Theirs was the last lap of the 270km relay that raised over $67,000 towards the Brain Tumour Foundation of Canada. (Armando Tura Photo)
Vikes Kick Cancer fundraiser in Saanich surpasses $67,000

Around the world, athletes virtually join Gordon Head relay

Looking Back, by Sheelane Stigant, is in Comox Valley bookstores now. Photo supplied.
84-year-old Comox author pens first novel

Pandemic allows writer to complete a project she began 17 years ago

A pickup truck was involved in an incident 9:30 p.m. Nov. 30. A witness who took the photo says the truck left the roadway, knocked over a fire hydrant before hitting a parked van and coming to rest in a yard. Photo by Michael Hack
VIDEO: Island pick-up truck takes out numerous vehicles, fire hydrant and hits house

Investigation underway after incident on the side of Campbell River street

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry updates B.C.’s coronavirus situation at the legislature, Nov. 30, 2020. (B.C. government)
Hockey team brought COVID-19 back from Alberta, B.C. doctor says

Dr. Bonnie Henry pleads for out-of-province travel to stop

The IIO’s chief civilian director has cleared Victoria police of any wrongdoing in the Nov. 21 death of a man they had earlier arrested. (Black Press Media file photo)
Investigation clears Victoria police of wrongdoing in arrested man’s death

Police watchdog determined police action or inaction played no role in man’s death

Most Read