Authorities too frequently put on a spin class that has nothing to do with this kind of fitness. (file photo)

EDITORIAL: Truth exists despite the jargon of today’s world

Despite the constant spin and relentless warping, truth still matters

Journalists have the dubious distinction of receiving information from both public and private interests who do their best to spin the message to put themselves in the best possible light.

Our challenge is to dig into those intentionally misleading messages, clearly designed to obfuscate the truth.

Take the press release for the “Personal Information Protection and Electronic Document Act” introduced by the federal government earlier this year. It touted a deep concern for protection against the misuse of personal information, and the presser gushed that “trust is indeed the linchpin of the digital economy.”

That press release failed to mention that StatCan officials were simultaneously and secretly trying to access Canadian’s personal banking information. It gave the release a sort of Orwellian doublespeak flavour.

This spring the federal Fisheries Department imposed crippling regulations that closed the doors of fishing operators in our region. The move was accompanied by a statement that said the government was taking the actions to “protect the communities and jobs that depend on chinook survival.”

In George Orwell’s 1984 he defined “doublethink” as the ability to simultaneously hold two contradictory thoughts and believe both of them.

Fisheries seemed to have mastered that ability.

Closer to home, last year we received a statement from a local school official who admonished us for the use of the term anti-bullying.

“We don’t really love the label ‘anti-bullying’. We’ll be advocating ‘kindness-promotion,’” they said.

The language may have been politically correct, but did little to help the Grade 8 student whose experience with bullying we reported shortly thereafter. Apparently, the bullies didn’t get the kindness memo.

Then, this week, the Ministry of Education released a statement that acknowledged that there were mistakes in the Grade 12 exam marks they’d released. Their error had the potential of affecting the students’ quest for admission to post-secondary institutions.

But instead of admitting their mistake, the ministry blamed the situation on “an anomaly in the tabulation of Grade 12 exam results.”

The term “anomaly” was an interesting choice as is defined as a deviation from the norm.

More than 24 hours later, they finally copped to “human error” as the cause. While unfortunate, human error amongst bureaucrats is far from anomalous.

It got us thinking. Despite the spin and warping of truth, it still matters. Facts do not cease to exist because they are hidden behind jargon and we all have a responsibility to seek the truth, even in today’s decidedly Orwellian times.



editor@sookenewsmirror.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Nanaimo blues musician’s mother’s home burglarized and ransacked

Judy Woodruff discovers bedroom of home in south Nanaimo turned upside-down; jewelry and art stolen

Vancouver Island man in Russia to reshape the future of hockey

NHL official Rob Schick talks to IIHF about switching European rule book to NHL rules

Couple collecting empties to feed VIU scholarship fund can’t pick up cans on campus anymore

Parmars have been picking up cans for 12 years; university now enforcing safety policy

Mom’s iPhone containing irreplaceable photos stolen from Royal Jubilee Hospital parkade

The phone contained photos, heartbeat recordings of her late son

‘Kind of lacking:’ Injured Bronco wonders why Canada won’t fund spinal surgery

“I think if Canada can step in and advance this program”

Yellowpoint Christmas Spectacular returns to Vancouver Island for 13th year

Festive stage production brings variety of dance and musical styles to Victoria, Nanaimo, Courtenay

Firefighters called to burning motorhome on Nanaimo’s waterfront

Nanaimo Fire Rescue extinguishes blaze Monday afternoon on Esplanade and Irwin Street

Victoria council chambers packed for ongoing environmental cruise ship discussions

Union workers, neighbourhood associations and more gathered for environmental conversations

Vancouver Island veterinarian heading to Africa with Veterinarians Without Borders

Dr. Roberta Templeton and her vet husband will help dairy farmers in Uganda

Group works for ‘Perfect Storm’ solution for Parksville Qualicum Beach doctor shortage

With feasibility study funded, group shares vision of ‘campus of healthcare’

Chilliwack family’s therapy dog injured in hit and run

Miniature pit bull Fifty’s owner is a single mother facing close to $10,000 in vet bills

Cougar destroyed in Penticton area after mauling dog, killing cat

This is the first reported incident with a cougar this year in the Penticton area

Feds not enforcing standards on Hungarian duck imports, B.C. farmer says

‘You have no way of knowing what’s in the bag’

Most Read