A new webiste in the Cowicyan Valley provides vital information for drug users to stay safe, including having a supply of naloxone (pictured) on hand. (File photo)

Website established to help home drug users stay safe in Cowichan

Site comes with up-to-date drug warnings and advice

With statistics indicating that approximately 60 per cent of overdoses among illicit drug users occur at home, a local initiative has begun to provide safety information to the community.

A website, which can be found at www.cvdopealerts.ca, has been created where people at home can log on regularly to see what is happening in terms of the safety of the local drug supply.

The website provides up-to-date “dope alerts” advising drug users about the quality of the drugs on the streets based on reports from other drug users and from other sources, and what to do if drugs are taken that can cause an overdose.

The website also has updates from Victoria’s bi-weekly dope guide, as well as information from Duncan’s Overdose Prevention Site on several issues, including local trends and overdose information.

RELATED STORY: ANOTHER YEAR ADDED TO DUNCAN’S OVERDOSE PREVENTION SITE

The site also has a form for people to submit their own information about overdoses if they wish to warn others within the community.

The website, which went into operation last week, was started by the local Community Action Team, which includes key community stakeholders, with funding from the Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions.

After a public health emergency was declared due to the ongoing opioid crisis in 2016, Community Action Teams were established by the ministry in areas of the province most-hard hit by the crisis to try to help deal with related problems and find solutions.

RELATED STORY: B.C.’S OVERDOSE PREVENTION STRATEGY SETS BLUEPRINT FOR REST OF WORLD

Stacey Middlemiss, a coordinator with the local Community Action Team, said the main reason that 60 per cent of overdoses occur at home is that most of the users don’t want many others to know about their drug habits due to the social stigma that is attached.

“The website idea was developed as a means to reach out to those doing drugs at home and don’t usually use the services in the community that are available to them,” Middlemiss said.

“We had looked at many ways to connect with people who do their drugs at home, including developing an app that they could log on to before they use, and if they don’t push a button after they use, it would trigger an emergency response. But it was determined that the app would be too expensive to set up.”



robert.barron@cowichanvalleycitizen.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

VIDEO: Comox’s waving granny gets incredible send-off from Highland Secondary students

Tinney Davidson has been waving at kids on their way to school for over 11 years, but is moving in a month

“Way more than bullying”: Island mom says daughter targeted

RCMP seeking witnesses for attack by four teens on student in Courtenay

Greater Victoria gas stations could push to 167.9 cents a litre this week

Analyst says high prices are due to supply and demand

Saanich Police salutes fallen officer

Const. Robert Kirby was killed in the line of duty on April 24, 1960

How worried should we be about Vancouver Island bees?

One bee species hasn’t been seen since 1990

Shutterbugs submit their favourite Snowbirds pics

The Canadian Forces Snowbirds are in Comox for their annual spring training… Continue reading

Police Taser distraught man claiming to be packing syringe full of gasoline

Suspect was taken to hospital after West Shore RCMP respond to disturbance call in View Royal

West Shore RCMP receives five cougar reports in two days in Colwood

Colwood and Sangster Elementary Schools taking precautions

Struggling B.C. adoption agency elects new board that intends to keep it open

The previous board announced that Choices would close May 31

Vancouver man, 19, charged in human trafficking case involving teen girl

The 16-year-old girl was reported missing and later discovered in Vancouver

Most Read