Katrine Conroy says two days of Columbia River Treaty negotiations have been completed in Victoria. Photo: Hansard TV

U.S. and Canada continue to talk Columbia River Treaty

Katrine Conroy says flood risk and hydro power were topics of discussion

The B.C’s minister responsible for the Columbia River Treaty says Canadian and American negotiators exchanged ideas on flood risk and hydropower during this week’s meetings in Victoria.

Kootenay West MLA Katrine Conroy said, in a statement Friday, that both sides met for two days to continue talks that began in May 2018.

“Negotiators had an honest exchange of views and perspectives, as they worked to find common ground on flood-risk management and hydropower co-ordination,” said Conroy. “Canada also raised the topics of other treaty benefits and adaptive management.”

Conroy said further technical work will be completed ahead of the next round of talks scheduled for June 19 and 20 in Washington, D.C. The treaty is set to expire in 2024.

Conroy also said Indigenous stakeholders are being consulted with, although her statement did not specify which First Nations the government is working with. The Ktunaxa Nation Council, Okanagan Nation Alliance and Shuswap Nation Council have previously expressed disappointment in being denied a seat at the negotiating table.

The Columbia River Treaty, which went into effect in 1964, led to three hydroelectric dams built in Canada and another in the U.S. In exchange for Canadian flood control and power generation, the U.S. paid $64 million over 60 years.

Canada also receives approximately $120 million annually, or half the value of power generated north of the border. Conroy has previously said that value has fallen over time.

The treaty, which did not include First Nations consultation when it was first drafted, led to the displacement of more than 2,000 residents, forced the flooding of 12 communities, destroyed agricultural land and blocked salmon from entering the Columbia River system.

CORRECTION: An earlier version of this story stated Katrine Conroy was participating in the treaty talks. Conroy does not have an active role in the negotiations.

Related:

Columbia River Treaty: What’s on the table?

U.S. payment to Canada a focus at Columbia River Treaty negotiations

B.C., U.S. negotiators want big changes to Columbia River Treaty

Have you heard of Renata?

Just Posted

World’s largest hockey stick getting new lights

New lighting system can change colours and patterns

Efforts begin to convert Kingzett Lake into a park

Victoria radio announcer begins initiative with petition

Vancouver Islander the world’s best shoe pitcher

Duncan’s Lindsay Hodgins wins horseshoe world championship

Vancouver Island aircraft structure grads in high demand

1,400 job openings for aircraft mechanics and inspectors by 2028: BC Labour Market Outlook

PHOTOS: Inside the opening of Langford’s expanded Westhills Stadium

The grand opening of the expanded West Shore stadium complex is on schedule for Aug. 24

VIDEO: Langley Ribfest met with protesters

Groups that oppose the event for various reasons plan to be on site each of the three days.

Canadians killed in Afghanistan honoured during emotional dedication ceremony

One-hundred-fifty-eight Canadian soldiers died during the mission

It’s snow joke: Up to 30 cm of snow expected to fall in northeastern B.C.

Alaska Highway, Fort Nelson to be hit with August snowstorm, according to Environment Canada

Sea-to-Sky Gondola in B.C. likely out of commission until 2020

Sea to Sky Gondola carries between 1,500 and 3,000 people every day during the summer season

Helicopter-riding dog Mr. Bentley now featured on cans of new B.C.-made beer

Partial proceeds from every pack go to Children’s Wish

PHOTOS: Weapons seized at Portland right-wing rally, counterprotests

Not all who gathered Saturday were with right-wing groups or antifa

Discussion on grief and loss between Stephen Colbert, Anderson Cooper goes viral

The exchange includes emotional question from Cooper, and outlook on grief as a child

Toronto activist calling on federal parties to nominate more black candidates

Fewer than 20 black Canadians have been nominated so far, including some Liberal MPs seeking re-election

Kraft Heinz brand baby food recalled in B.C. due to possibility of insects

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency says the product should not be consumed

Most Read