Garbage sorters Elizabeth Garrett, Lara Lauzon and Meegan Armstrong. (Ron Carter photo)

Garbage sorters Elizabeth Garrett, Lara Lauzon and Meegan Armstrong. (Ron Carter photo)

Thousands visit Oak Bay during Tea Party, leave only three bins of trash

Volunteer sorters divert 2,400 pounds to compost rather than landfill

The equivalent of three household bins of trash are all that hit the landfill after the 56th annual Oak Bay Tea Party according to the lead sorter.

“Half of that wasn’t even garbage. Half of it was just too dirty to be recycled,” said Noreen Taylor, adding she’s working with vendors to whittle it down each year. “If we separate more at source I expect we won’t even have that much garbage.”

Other items diverted from the trash include nine bags of returnables, five bags of soft plastics, more than four of hard plastic and metal, a little foil and a “dusting” of glass.

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“Last year was really record breaking, we weren’t as much as last year,” Taylor said. Rain slowed crowds Sunday, meaning less recycling and trash in general.

While it has yet to be weighed, she estimates the event created 2,400 pounds of compost.

It was also a smooth process, with the usual volunteers in place and the help of Oak Bay Parks Services.

“This year I had six people who volunteered who all have done it before and know the work really well. It was efficient,” Taylor said. “We weren’t harried, we weren’t behind the eight ball all the time.”

She’s also happy with the Oak Bay Tea Party Society’s balloon ban in the parade that appeared to be a hit with Oak Bay News readers.

“I’m ecstatic,” Taylor said. “They’re very destructive to habitat … the time has come.”


 

cvanreeuwyk@oakbaynews.com

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Oak Bay Tea Party trash sorting guru Noreen Taylor with the little trash left in 2018. (Ron Carter photo)

Oak Bay Tea Party trash sorting guru Noreen Taylor with the little trash left in 2018. (Ron Carter photo)