Medical director, Dr. Elizabeth Swiggum, on an exercise machine in the gym of the Cardiac Rehabilitation program at Island Health. (Travis Paterson/News Staff)

Medical director, Dr. Elizabeth Swiggum, on an exercise machine in the gym of the Cardiac Rehabilitation program at Island Health. (Travis Paterson/News Staff)

Taking the pulse of Vancouver Island’s heart failure clinic

Heart failure victims able to rehabilitate in the Cardiac Risk Reduction/Rehabilitation Program.

At the south end of the third floor in the Royal Block at Royal Jubilee Hospital is a gym full of exercise equipment.

Rowing machines, stair machines, treadmills, elliptical machines and more. From the exercise machines, the view of the South Jubilee neighbourhood is actually quite nice.

But what makes the room truly special are the patients using the equipment. They’ve all suffered heart failure and are able to rehabilitate under the close watch of physiotherapists, cardiologists, nurses and other health professionals who work there in the Heart Function Clinic and Cardiac Risk Reduction/Rehabilitation Program.

Patients with a more sensitive situation can be wired during exercise so the attending physician can monitor them beyond just their pulse.

READ MORE: Oak Bay author pens guide to living with heart disease

READ ALSO: Oak Bay Kindness Kids Club pronounces June 10 as Kindness Day

And with 12.7 million Canadians identifying as inactive in the last census – less half an hour of activity per day at a level similar to walking – the medical director of the Cardiac Rehabilitation program, cardiologist Dr. Elizabeth Swiggum, expects the demand to grow. That’s 48 per cent of the population over the age of 12.

“The population is aging, and as patients age, they accumulate medical issues that are very complex,” said Swiggum, who helped establish the only heart failure clinic on Vancouver Island in 2005.

The “heart failure clinic” is the only one in-hospital on the Island though patients can access cardiac rehabilitation throughout the Island through the Take Heart programs. They’re usually run through municipal recreation centres and use kinesiologists specially trained in supporting people with heart failure.

The key to rehabilitating people with heart failure, and their other issues, is access to a multi-disciplinary clinic, Swiggum said.

“It’s very complex,” Swiggum said. “A lot of people are already without a primary physician. You want to work with the primary caregivers in the community as collaboratively as you can.”

Some who use the rehab centre have a new heart transplanted at the Heart Centre at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver. Others have a genetic history and are at risk.

Symptoms include rhythm and valve abnormalities that might make exercise at a higher level risky. Of course diet is also a key factor. But the users are of all ages, and for the younger users it is typically abnormalities that lead them there.

“Cardiac rehabilitation is also meant to help patients with a history of cardiac disease that could be a heart attack or open-heart surgery for a heart valve,” Swiggum said.

Once a patient has either had surgery or has engaged their treatment plan, there comes a question as to how much effort is the right amount, especially for someone recovering from heart surgery.

“There are some patients who identify themselves with a higher level of activity, and if they’re not allowed to exercise at that higher level of activity, they might lose a little of their identity,” said Swiggum, who has run a dozen marathons herself.

“By their nature, many people are apt to do high-intensity exercise. We want them to self-recognize and self-regulate. Patients in recovery are actually capable of a lot but are afraid to reach those levels.”

As for the the gym, it’s well equipped.

“What we probably need more of is human resources,” Swiggum said.

There are many other heart failure clinics in B.C., but all with the proviso that they’re underfunded, Swiggum said.

“B.C. probably doesn’t support as much as we would like for cardiac rehab for secondary prevention. Contrast that with other provinces – Saskatchewan, Manitoba, pay for cardiac rehab, whereas here in B.C. part of the fee is paid for by users.”

What makes Victoria’s heart failure clinic stand out is the person who runs it.

Swiggum has a belief that ‘exercise is medicine.’

“The exercise rehabilitation program is transformative for our patients and they leave here with renewed confidence in themselves and their ability,” said Adrienne Maurakis, physiotherapist in the Cardiac and Respiratory Rehabilitation program. “Swiggum’s expertise and support is a big part of that transformation.”

Improving patients’ lives is a key motivator for Swiggum, and so is her role as a medical leader for education about heart failure in the community of physicians.

“Our role is to make sure patients are safe,” Swiggum said.

“There might be some patients who can exercise at a higher intensity and need that support to reach that and maintain that identity.”

reporter@oakbaynews.com

Just Posted

Cory Mills, Eric Blackmore and A.J. Jensen, all 20, drown in the Sooke River in February 2020. (Contributed photos)
Coroner confirms ‘puddle jumping’ in 2020 drowning deaths of three Sooke men

Cory Mills, Eric Blackmore and A.J. Jensen pulled into raging river driving through nearby flooding

Nanaimo-raised singer Allison Crowe with director Zack Snyder on the set of ‘Man of Steel’ in 2011. Crowe performs a cover of Leonard Cohen’s Hallelujah in the upcoming director’s cut of ‘Justice League.’ (Photo courtesy Clay Enos)
B.C. musician records song for upcoming ‘Justice League’ film

Allison Crowe’s close connection to director led to rendition of Leonard Cohen’s Hallelujah

A 50-year-old man was stabbed in an altercation that started with a disagreement about physical distancing. (File photo)
Argument about physical distancing leads to stabbing in Nanaimo

Suspect arrested on Gabriola Island an hour after incident Wednesday, Feb. 24

A battery electric-hybrid ferry, pictured here, is expected to make its way to Vancouver Island in late 2021, says B.C. Ferries. (Submitted photo)
Hybrid ferry for Gabriola-Nanaimo route launches in shipyard in Europe

Two hybrid vessels to replace MV Quinsam by early 2022, says B.C. Ferries

G.P. Vanier in Courtenay has six members of the community who have tested positive; Island Health identified seven staff and 78 students who will be required to self-isolate. Black Press file photo
Eight sick, 108 more isolating in Comox Valley school district due to COVID-19

District says that all who tested positive did not contract COVID-19 within the school sites

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry updates B.C.’s COVID-19 situation at the B.C. legislature. (B.C. government)
B.C. reports 10 additional deaths, 395 new COVID-19 cases

The majority of new coronavirus infections were in the Fraser Health region

Nanaimo Ladysmith Public Schools is preparing a rapid response team proposal for submission to the B.C. Ministry of Education. (Chris Bush/News Bulletin)
Nanaimo-Ladysmith school district chosen as COVID-19 rapid response team

Team to consist of SD68 and Island Health staff, according to B.C. Ministry of Education

A new survey has found that virtual visits are British Columbian’s preferred way to see the doctor amid the COVID-19 pandemic. (Unsplash)
Majority of British Columbians now prefer routine virtual doctor’s visits: study

More than 82% feel virtual health options reduce wait times, 64% think they lead to better health

Captain and Maria, a pair of big and affectionate akbash dogs, must be adopted together because they are so closely bonded. (SPCA image)
Shuswap SPCA seeks forever home for inseparable Akbash dogs

A fundraiser to help medical expenses for Captain and Maria earned over 10 times its goal

The missing camper heard a GSAR helicopter, and ran from his tree well waving his arms. File photo
Man trapped on Manning mountain did nearly everything right to survive: SAR

The winter experienced camper was overwhelmed by snow conditions

Castlegar doctor Megan Taylor contracted COVID-19 in November. This photo was taken before the pandemic. Photo: Submitted
Kootenay doctor shares experience contracting COVID-19

Castlegar doctor shares her COVID experience

Ashley Paxman, 29, is in the ICU after being struck by a vehicle along Highway 97 Feb. 18, 2021. She remains in critical condition. (GoFundMe)
Okanagan woman in ICU with broken bones in face after being struck by car

She remains in serious condition following Feb. 18 incident

Vancouver International Women in Film Festival kicks off March 5.
Women in Film Festival features two B.C. filmmakers

The 16th annual festival kicks off March 5, 2021

The BC SPCA is offering many chances for school-aged kids to learn about animal welfare and other animal topics. Pictured here is Keith, a three-month-old kitten seen on Nov. 4, 2020 at the Chilliwack SPCA. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress file)
From pets to wildlife, BC SPCA offers animal education programs geared to youth

BC SPCA offering virtual spring break camps, workshops and school presentations

Most Read