Victoria man, Jeremy Maddock, has been prohibited from practicing law until he becomes in good standing with the Law Society of B.C. (Black Press Media file photo)

Supreme Court bans Victoria man from practising law

Jeremy Maddock received a law degree in 2016 but never completed articling

A Victoria man was barred from practising law after a Supreme Court of B.C. justice determined he was not a lawyer and therefore his clients were not protected under the Legal Profession Act.

In a judgment posted online on Thursday, Justice Palbinder Shergill ordered Jeremy Maddock, a self-employed legal consultant, to be permanently prohibited from practicing law until he becomes a member in good standing of the Law Society of British Columbia after they received numerous complaints about his actions.

Prior to the order, Maddock would provide legal research services to lawyers, draft legal documents and arguments, along with attending court on traffic violations offences. Maddock received a law degree from the University of Victoria in 2016 but never completed full articling.

READ ALSO: Saanich’s plastic bag ban won’t be affected by the Supreme Court ruling against Victoria

In 2017 and 2018 the Law Society received numerous complaints that Maddock was performing legal services for clients in Victoria and Vancouver.

During the Vancouver case in 2018, Maddock was representing Ali Yusuf, a practicing lawyer who was unsuccessful in representing himself on a traffic violation. Maddock believed that being under the supervision of a practicing lawyer would therefore protect him from violating the Legal Profession Act, despite charging a fee for the services. Justice Shergill determined Yusuf was Maddock’s client.

Following the Yusuf case, the Law Society informed Maddock they believed his actions to be in contravene of the Legal Profession Act. He didn’t respond to the Law Society’s notification, and instead filed the current action, which took place in November of 2018, seeking declaratory relief.

READ ALSO: Saanich man killed in Alberta shooting

In April of 2019, the Law Society filed its own appeal seeking an injunction to restrain Maddock from practicing the law.

Maddock argued that under the Offence Act, he was entitled to appear as ‘agent’ in non-criminal, provincial traffic matters for a fee. Shergill stated that Maddock was not the first to argue this, citing a company that was subject to a number of lawsuits in the 1980s. Former police officers were found to be in contravention of the Legal Profession Act by the Court of Appeal for charging a fee for legal advice and representation of people facing non-criminal, motor vehicle-related offences.

Shergill stated that she had “reason to believe” Maddock would continue to practice law “unless he is restrained by a court order.”

Maddock also argued that “access to justice” justified his breaches of the Legal Profession Act, but “the solution … is not to permit untrained, unregulated and unaccountable individuals to act as legal counsel,” read the judgment.

“In drafting the provisions of the [Legal Professions Act], they were no doubt aware that a non-lawyer may have the skills and technical knowledge to provide legal services to members of the public for free or at a reduced rate,” wrote Justice Shergill. “Nonetheless, they determined it would be against the public interest to permit that person to freely do so without regulatory oversight.”

Justice Shergill added that Maddock was not required to meet “minimum competency requirements,” engage in continuing professional development or comply with the codes of conduct hence he was not subject to disciplinary actions and his clients did not have solicitor-client privilege.



kendra.crighton@blackpress.ca

Follow us on Instagram
Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Wildfire smoke expected to blanket Greater Victoria again

Conditions expected to worsen Wednesday afternoon but not approach levels reached a few weeks ago

Former Victoria Royals manager celebrates Stanley Cup win

Grant Armstrong is now an amateur scout with Tampa Bay Lightning

PHOTOS: Killer whales make rare visit into Ladysmith Harbour

Orca pod inspires some fine photography

Tofino considers beach fire ban after tumultuous summer

Fires popping up where they aren’t allowed, and not properly cared for where they are

Editorial: Shake of the fatigue and bring this pandemic march home

With the finish line getting closer, don’t let up in the battle against COVID-19

105 new COVID-19 cases, 1 death as health officials urge B.C. to remember safety protocols

There are currently 1268 active cases, with 3,337 people under public health monitoring

Protesters blockade log-sort operation at Nanaimo’s Duke Point

Extinction Rebellion Nanaimo demands an end to all old-growth logging in B.C.

Float-plane crash near Oyster River leaves pilot injured

The plane crashed shortly after take-off from a private property and had no other passengers on board

U.S. Presidential Debate Takeaways: An acrid tone from the opening minute

Here are key takeaways from the first of three scheduled presidential debates before Election Day on Nov. 3

Sooke, Sidney businesses win top awards during the BC Food and Beverage Awards

Sheringham Distillery won Gold Award for Product of Year while Cascadia Seaweed won Innovation Award

Chorus expands online options to in-person rehearsal in Langford, Oak Bay

Free, non-auditioned SingYourJoy recruits those aged 16 to 29

Nanaimo’s new NightOwls baseball team announces first player signings

Four NCAA Div. 1 players, three of them Canadians, added to roster

Bucket list: Mid-Island set to come alive with special drumming

Pair of programs scheduled to take place starting October

B.C. nurses report rise in depression, anxiety, exhaustion due to pandemic

A new UBC study looks into how the COVID-19 response has impacted frontline nurses

Most Read