BC Liberal candidate Stephen Roberts. (nuttycake.com)

Stephen Roberts returns for a third run for BC Liberals in Saanich North and the Islands

Roberts follows career in international banking with involvement with several local non-profits

The lineup of names opposing incumbent Adam Olsen for MLA in Saanich North and the Islands is filling up.

Stephen Roberts hopes the third time is the charm as he will run again for the BC Liberals. While the party has yet to formally announce him as its candidate, the local executive nominated him Monday.

Roberts finished in third in 2017 with roughly 26.5 per cent of the vote, and second in 2013 with about 33 per cent. He questioned the need for an election now, accusing the New Democrats of playing with the health of British Columbians.

“Our first message is that the election is not necessary in a pandemic, and we are going to need to be very careful as we go out and reach out to voters,” he said, pointing to the high number of vulnerable residents in the riding. “And as if that wasn’t enough, the NDP … is also violating the fixed election law and they are breaking their agreement with the Greens to provide stable government for four years.”

Such behaviour shows the public cannot trust the New Democrats, Roberts said. “Most importantly going into the election, we need a competent administration to build BC after this pandemic is over. We need competent economic managers and people who are competent running ministries to make sure BC gets back on track, and only BC Liberals are going to be able to deliver.”

When asked where New Democrats have failed, Roberts acknowledged “we (as B.C.) have done a great job” to date in terms of the pandemic itself.

“[Provincial health officer Dr.] Bonnie Henry is largely responsible for that,” he said. “I don’t think that the provincial government can take as much credit as they think they can for it.” Specifically, he accused the province of mishandling the $5 billion relief package passed across party lines in the spring. “They haven’t spent the money yet, they haven’t delivered for British Columbians.”

RELATED: Citing stability, B.C. Premier calls snap election for Oct. 24

When asked why he would make a better MLA than Olsen, Roberts said it is important for the riding to have representation in a party with the potential to govern. “You get very little done with minority representation,” he said. “I don’t know if Adam Olsen has done a lot for the riding actually over his three years. Mostly, he has been supporting the NDP. That was a surprise for many voters.”

A current resident of Salt Spring Island, Roberts was born in Sidney. Professionally, he worked abroad (London, New York, and Hong Kong) as the chief operating officer (COO) in the investment research divisions of three international banks.

“Since I came back home, I have very involved in the non-profit sector,” said Roberts, who chairs the Vancouver Hospice Society. He has also been involved with organizations on Salt Spring Island and Saanich Peninsula, including as a board member of the Mary Winspear Centre’s Memorial Park Society, and being an active supporter of the Peninsula Streams Society and Saanich Peninsula LionsFood Bank.


Do you have a story tip? Email: vnc.editorial@blackpress.ca.

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram, and like us on Facebook.

wolfgang.depner@peninsulanewsreview.com

Just Posted

Hirdeypal Batth, 24, has been charged with sexual assault and forcible confinement in relation to an incident in August 2020. (VPD handout)
Man, 24, charged with sex assault after allegedly posing as fake Uber driver in Vancouver

Investigators believe their could be more victims outside of the Vancouver area

Artists, activists and supporters stand at the ‘More Justice, More Peace’ mural in Victoria’s Bastion Square after the letter ‘S’ was painted over in black. (Nina Grossman/News Staff)
ACAB removed from Victoria’s More Justice, More Peace mural

New message points to VicPD, City of Victoria for silencing BIPOC voices

(file)
Province rejects Parksville needle bylaw as counter-productive to health and safety

Mayor says he fails to understand the logic against proposed limits on hypodermic distribution

An untitled Emily Carr painting of Finlayson Point was donated to the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria by brothers Ian and Andrew Burchett. The painting had been in their family for several decades. (Courtesy of the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria)
Newly public Emily Carr painting depicts well-known Victoria view

Painting among several donated to Art Gallery of Greater Victoria

An illustration was given to the Parksville’s Church of the Ascension by a person, in appreciation for allowing use of its shower facility. (Mike Favero/Submitted photo)
Parksville church makes showers available to the homeless

Pastor receives special illustration from one appreciative person

Burnaby RCMP responded to a dine-and-dash suspect who fell through a ceiling in March 2020. (RCMP handout)
VIDEO: Suspected dine-and-dasher falls through ceiling of Burnaby restaurant

A woman believed to be dashing on her restaurant bill fell through the kitchen ceiling

Academic Edge runs at North Island College in Courtenay. Photo courtesy NIC
NIC and VIU launch regional work-integrated learning hub

Aim to create new, mutually beneficial opportunities for students and employers north of the Malahat

B.C. Premier John Horgan and Washington Gov. Jay Inslee arrive for annual Cascadia conference in Vancouver, Oct. 10, 2018. They have agreed to coordinate the permanent switch to daylight saving time. (B.C. government)
B.C. still awaiting U.S. approval to eliminate daylight saving time

Clocks going back one hour Nov. 1 in Washington too

The Comox Valley Airport had a recent flight arrive with a confirmed case of COVID-19. File photo
COVID-19 exposure on flight into Comox

WestJet flight 3315 from Calgary to Comox was identified with a case

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau shakes hands with US Vice-President Joe Biden on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Friday, December 9, 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Patrick Doyle
A Biden presidency could mean good news for Canadian environment policy: observers

Experts and observers say even a U.S. outside the Paris agreement may ultimately end up in the same place

People take a photo together during the opening night of Christmas Lights Across Canada, in Ottawa, on Wednesday, Dec. 4, 2019. The likelihood that most Canadians will enjoy a holly jolly Christmas season of gatherings, caroling and travel is unlikely, say public health experts who encourage those who revel in holiday traditions to accept more sacrifices ahead. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang
Ho, ho, no: Experts advise preparing for a scaled-back COVID holiday season

Many of the holiday season’s highlights have already been scrapped or are unlikely to take place

Sen. Kim Pate is shown in Toronto in an October 15, 2013, file photo. The parliamentary budget office says a proposed law that would give judges discretion on whether to apply a lesser sentence for murder could save the federal government $8.3 million per year. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Colin Perkel
Judicial discretion for mandatory minimum sentences for murder would save $8.3M: PBO

The result would be fewer people in long-term custody at federal correctional institutions, experts say

Commissioner Austin Cullen looks at documents before opening statements at the Cullen Commission of Inquiry into Money Laundering in British Columbia, in Vancouver on February 24, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
RCMP lacked dedicated team to investigate illegal activities at casino, inquiry hears

Hearings for the inquiry are set to continue into next week and the inquiry is expected to wrap up next year

Robert Riley Saunders. (File)
Court approves money for B.C. foster children alleging harm from Kelowna social worker

The maximum combined total award for basic payments and elevated damages for an individual is $250,000

Most Read