Comox Valley RCMP say that trucks adorned with Christmas lights violate the Motor Vehicle Act and could be distracting for drivers.

Police ‘won’t waver’ to allow lighted trucks to drive in the Valley

Following a warning to two drivers who decorate their trucks with Christmas lights, Comox Valley RCMP Inspector Tim Walton told Comox council Wednesday he cannot give permission to have them drive around the Valley.

Following his quarterly update to council, Walton was asked about the situation which has gained traction around the community and through social media.

In a letter sent to Comox Coun. Ken Grant, Erin Kaetler explained on behalf of the Comox Valley Christmas Light Trucks, the goal of the lighted trucks driving throughout the Valley is to visit care homes, homes where people may be confined due to illness or disability, to spread Christmas cheer and to collect donations for charities.

“We started to develop a following and soon the Christmas Light Trucks became a much loved annual tradition in the Comox Valley,” she wrote, and added the idea began in 2013 following the Cumberland parade.

Grant read the last paragraph to council and Walton, which stated: “We understand that the officers have a job to do and we fully respect their concern with the lights on the busy main roads, however, our ask is that we be allowed to continue to drive through the quiet residential neighbourhoods in first gear (approximately 10 km/hr) for the next 10 days, so that we can bring the joy of the Christmas lights to people that cannot get out of their homes to see them.”

Grant told Walton it might be best if the two parties had a conversation, and to come up with a solution.

“I think that would be the best fit for everybody in my personal opinion.”

Walton explained the RCMP have had direct contact with some of the people and drivers involved.

“Going beyond that, it would be inappropriate for me to discuss operational matters, whether it’s enforcement, or the Motor Vehicle Act,” he said.

“But I cannot, however, give permission to anybody to operate a vehicle equipped with illegal lights. That’s the public message I won’t waver from. We have had conversations and I’m sure we’re going to get more inquiries.”

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