Nanaimo Mayor Leonard Krog gives his first speech as mayor at a council meeting Monday, Nov. 5, at the Vancouver Island Conference Centre. GREG SAKAKI/The News Bulletin

Nanaimo Mayor Leonard Krog gives his first speech as mayor at a council meeting Monday, Nov. 5, at the Vancouver Island Conference Centre. GREG SAKAKI/The News Bulletin

Nanaimo’s new mayor aims to restore peace and confidence

Mayor Leonard Krog and city councillors take oath of office

Nanaimo hit the reset button Monday night with a new council and a mayor promising peace and good government.

On the heels of a dysfunctional four-year term fraught with lawsuits, firings, resignations, investigations, innuendo and infighting that garnered national headlines, residents hope electing eight new faces from 2014 will result in the change they were looking for.

New Mayor Leonard Krog accepted the chains of office by former mayor Bill McKay saying both he and the incoming council understand the “incredible expectations” of the community.

“It is clear that this council is united around a number of things that it wants to see happen,” he said. “It wants restoration of good governance; it wants peace at city hall; it wants good relations with its workers, its employees … union, management, whoever; it wants to have a sense in this city that we are going forward.”

Krog, who resigned his seat as the city’s former long-time MLA to become mayor, said all members of council will have a voice and he said he recognizes what his voice will mean as mayor.

“My one hope is that when the mayor speaks, that mayor will be able to say with some confidence and satisfaction that the mayor speaks on behalf of a council that has done its work, that has come to a decision and is prepared to defend it and justify it to the people who’ve given them the great honour you have by electing them to public office,” he said.

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McKay offered advice to the incoming council, asking them to “please help to stamp out hate” which he said is unproductive, and to listen to others carefully.

“You’ll be amazed with what you will learn,” McKay said. “You will broaden your knowledge and you’ll be seen as a government who wants to make the very best decisions for all of the community.”

He told members of council he’ll be thinking of them every day during their term. He said they should celebrate collective wins and shouldn’t get disheartened.

“Every day, wake up and ask yourself, ‘What can I do to make life in my community a bit better for all? What opportunities can I provide for all?’ Then put your shoes on and start your journey that day,” McKay said.

OPINION: Nanaimo not only voted, but voted with purpose

ELECTION DAY: Krog voted in as Nanaimo’s next mayor

WEB POLL: How do you feel about the new city council Nanaimo has elected?



editor@nanaimobulletin.com

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