The majority of city council votes in favour of this design for a new Salmon Arm flag on Monday, May 10, 2021. (City of Salmon Arm image)

The majority of city council votes in favour of this design for a new Salmon Arm flag on Monday, May 10, 2021. (City of Salmon Arm image)

Majority of council salutes new flag for Salmon Arm

Two councillors raise concerns about logo being too corporate for a flag

A new look will be waving from the skies above the city hall courtyard.

Although not everyone saluted the new creation, a majority of city council voted in approval May 10 of a new design for the Salmon Arm flag.

City staff provided five samples of potential designs, all variations on a theme, with a recommendation to choose the one with the white background. The printing on the flag included the Salmon Arm wordmark – ‘Salmon’ in orange and ‘Arm’ in teal, with ‘Small city, big ideas’ printed in smaller teal letters below.

Rob Niewenhuizen, the city’s director of engineering and public works, outlined how in 2017, 12 local organizations, including the City of Salmon Arm, came together to form a brand leadership team to work on a community brand and marketing strategy.

His report stated “with the common goal of attracting new talent and investment, the team worked with a consultant to draw out Salmon Arm’s competitive advantages and our unique and authentic story.”

In October 2018, council voted unanimously in support of the ‘Small city, big ideas’ brand, and staff were told to gradually change over to the new branding.

The flag’s turn has arrived.

Read more: 2017 – Salmon Arm Economic Development Society to spearhead project

Read more: 2018 – Choose a brand for Salmon Arm

Read more: 2018 – Salmon Arm – ‘Small city, big ideas’ brand approved

The Salmon Arm Economic Development Society’s samples were based on the city’s branding guidelines. They included three versions similar to the white one recommended: an ‘Ida blue’, an orange, and a light blue ‘Lakeshore’ background, with the same words displayed in the foreground. A fifth sample had an orange background with the wording placement switched. ‘Small city, big ideas’ was larger with ‘Salmon Arm’ smaller as the tagline.

Staff noted bright colours usually fade more quickly, so the white background was the option of choice.

The outgoing Salmon Arm flag also featured a white background, but the words ‘Salmon Arm’ were written rather than printed, and a blue oval above the name displayed a stylized lake and mountain, with sunshine peeking from behind the mountain.

Couns. Sylvia Lindgren and Tim Lavery were opposed to the new design.

“I wanted a flag that said something about what a great place it was for people and families and community and recreation, and I think we’re getting a flag that says, ‘open for business,’” Lindgren remarked.

Lavery said he’s been a full supporter of the branding process, with a substantial portion of his clothing bearing the branding. But he thinks the flag message should be broader.

“To my mind, broader ideas represent Indigenous heritage, Shuswap Lake, Mount Ida, and the reasons we’re all here.”

He said he sees the new design as a well-intentioned corporate logo that doesn’t have a place on the city flag.

Read more: 2018 – Salmon Arm’s story

Read more: 2019 – Gaining momentum: City councillor pedals Salmon Arm’s new brand

Read more: 2019 – Column: Salmon Arm and Duncan, small towns with brand similarities

Coun. Louise Wallace Richmond noted the city’s outgoing flag is also the brand-mark on a white background. She said she sees the change as updating the brand-mark.

“It is a conversation piece, it is an invitation, it is not colonial, it is not territorial, it is about ideas and acceptance and inclusion and I will very much support this.”

Coun. Kevin Flynn said he is frustrated by comments about not enough public input and described the new flag as a community branding, not a corporate one.

“I think to ignore the research, the significant public input, the professionals coming up with the branding and the logo, it doesn’t make sense.”

Mayor Alan Harrison said flags have changed over the years and the new one is similar in style to those of other smaller communities.

He added: “Flags are kind of personal things. It’s not surprising we have differences of thoughts…”


marthawickett@saobserver.net
Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Salmon Arm council

Just Posted

Processed sewage is still being deposited at the Hartland landfill rather than sent as biosolids to a Richmond cement plant. (Black Press Media file photo)
Treated sewage bound for dump until CRD upgrades processing to required standard

Richmond cement plant up and running, but CRD end product not suitable for purpose

Threads N Tails owner Lee-Ann Burke’s pet clothing has been featured on the cover of the June/July issue of Pet Connection Magazine. (Submitted)
Lake Cowichan business featured on magazine cover

Lee-Ann Burke hopes the extra publicity will increase sales

Improving safety at Keating Cross Road and the Pat Bay Highway is the goal of the flyover project currently in the works. The province aims to reveal the final cost and design this fall. (Screencap/Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure)
Final budget, design of Keating flyover in Central Saanich still in the works

Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure says information coming by this fall

Colin Davidson won $100K on a Set for Life scratch ticket in Sooke. (BCLC photo)
Sooke man does ‘happy dance’ after scratching a $100,000 Set for Life win

Colin Davidson plans to renovate his home and invest in his daughter’s education

West Shore RCMP K9 Halla. (Black Press Media file photo)
Sound of RCMP dog enough to stop suspects in Oak Bay

West Shore RCMP K9 unit called in, didn’t get to chase

People watch a car burn during a riot following game 7 of the NHL Stanley Cup final in downtown Vancouver, B.C., in this June 15, 2011 photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Geoff Howe
10 years ago: Where were you during the 2011 Vancouver Stanley Cup Riots?

Smashed-in storefronts, looting, garbage can fires and overturned cars some of the damage remembered today

A worker, at left, tends to a customer at a cosmetics shop amid the COVID-19 pandemic Thursday, May 20, 2021, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
Half of cosmetics sold in Canada, U.S. contain toxic chemicals: study

Researchers tested more than 230 commonly used cosmetics and found that 56% of foundations and eye products, 48% of lip products and 47% of mascaras contained high levels of fluorine

White Rock’s Marine Drive has been converted to one-way traffic to allow more patio space for waterfront restaurants. (Peace Arch News)
Province promotes permanent pub patios in B.C. post-pandemic plan

More than 2,000 temporary expansions from COVID-19 rules

Lake City Secondary School Williams Lake campus students Ethan Reid, from left, Brenden Higgins, Ty Oviatt, Kaleb Alphonse, Nathan Kendrick and Landon Brink with RCMP officers Const. Nicoll and Const. Stancec. (Photo submitted)
RCMP thank 6 teens for helping prevent forest fire in Williams Lake

The students came across fire in a wooded area and used the water they had to try and extinguish the flames

There is an emergency shelter near the Golden Ears peaks. (Facebook/Special to The News)
Hiker fogged in on Golden Ears, spends 2 nights

Talon Helicopters, Ridge Meadows Search and Rescue bring him home Monday

Annamie Paul, leader of the Green Party of Canada, speaks at a news conference on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, on June 10, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang
Green Leader Annamie Paul facing no-confidence motion from party brass

move follows months of internal strife and the defection of MP Jenica Atwin to the Liberals

Tulips bloom in front of the Supreme Court of Canada in Ottawa, Thursday, May 10, 2018. Day two of a full week of scheduled hearings will be heard in Federal Court today on a case involving Indigenous children unnecessarily taken into foster care by what all parties call Canada’s “broken child welfare system.” THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
AFN slams Ottawa for ‘heartless’ legal challenge of First Nations child compensation

2019 decision awarded $40,000 to each Indigenous child removed before 2006

Rick Ruppenthal of Saltair will host a 12-hour talk-a-thon Friday, June 18 over Facebook live. (Photo submitted)
Talk-a-thon to focus on men’s mental health issues

Island man spearheading a campaign to generate more conversation during fundraiser

Most Read