Sun Life Financial Inc. President and CEO Dean Connor attends the company’s annual general meeting in Toronto on Wednesday, May 6, 2015. Amid the grim backdrop of COVID-19 fatalities, Canadian insurers have also found an increased interest in life and health insurance. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Sun Life Financial Inc. President and CEO Dean Connor attends the company’s annual general meeting in Toronto on Wednesday, May 6, 2015. Amid the grim backdrop of COVID-19 fatalities, Canadian insurers have also found an increased interest in life and health insurance. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Insurers see profit gains despite ‘tough year’ of COVID-19 fatalities

Chief executive of Manulife Canada said the pandemic may have increased the appetite for insurance in Canada

Amid the grim backdrop of COVID-19 fatalities, Canadian insurers have also found some consumers have an increased interest in life and health insurance.

Sun Life chief executive Dean Connor said it was a “tough year” as the insurer paid out $200 million to the families of clients who succumbed to COVID-19. But Sun Life also said it saw lower benefits usage brought about by the pandemic as it extended grace periods for premium payments.

The comments were part of conference calls with analysts about the insurers’ fourth-quarter financial results. Both Manulife and Sun Life grew profits during the last three months of 2020 and beat average analyst expectations from financial data firm Refinitiv.

When announcing the results, Manulife chief executive Roy Gori said the “events of the past year have reinforced the value of insurance, well-being, retirement and wealth management programs.” Manulife chief actuary Steven Finch said the company had “shored up” in anticipation during the pandemic and was prepared for the COVID19-related claims.

Manulife said there were mortality losses from excess deaths in its U.S. life insurance business, alongside claim terminations in the long-term care insurance business due to the impact of COVID-19. In addition to life insurance, the company offers policies that cover the cost of long-term services and support.

Michael Doughty, the chief executive of Manulife Canada, said that the COVID-19 pandemic may have also increased the appetite for insurance in Canada.

“We do know that, you know, coming out of the SARS crisis, we did see an increase in interest in life insurance. And I think that is one trend that we’ll see around the globe, frankly, as as we move forward.

“We certainly see it already,” said Doughty, who added that sales of individual health and dental insurance were up in Canada, as well as mortgage creditor business.

During early stages of the COVID-19 lockdowns last year, Doughty said that traditional individual life insurance sales initially suffered in Canada as people weren’t able to get paramedical testing. But between the third and fourth quarters last year, sales bounced back, rising 17 per cent, Doughty said

“There certainly is more frequency of short-term disability claims caused by COVID-19,” said Daniel Fishbein, president of Sun Life Financial U.S. “The other aspect of this is sales. Sales have remained strong for us. They were up year-over-year, and strong in all of our businesses.”

The two Toronto-based insurers have been vying for growth internationally as they try to hedge their businesses against various risks and diversify their portfolios. Asia has become a key market for both brands, both in established financial centres like Hong Kong and emerging markets.

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Manulife’s Gori called Asia the “Crown jewel” of the business, rising from 35 per cent of earnings in 2016 to 41 per cent in 2020. By 2025, Asia could represent about half of the company’s earnings base, Gori said. Sun Life executives called Asia a market with “huge potential” where they are focused on building scale.

Both Manulife and Sun Life also pointed to their digital initiatives. Sun Life said it had tripled the number of workers using its digital Maxwell Health tools between 2019 and 2020.Manulife subsidiary John Hancock launched a collaboration with Amazon in the U.S., where gave free wearable health trackers to life insurance customers.

“From a Canadian perspective, we certainly have also taken advantage of the pandemic to digitize a lot of our processes,” Manulife’s Doughty said. “I think that will help with the ability to process sales and make it easier for both customers and advisors going forward.”

Sun Life’s Connor also noted the company’s focus on improving climate-change related disclosures and getting better diversity within in the company. Connor said Sun Life plans to have gender parity at the executive level by 2025, and have 25 per cent of executive roles staffed by underrepresented ethnicities in North America, including goals for Black and Indigenous people of color.

Gabriel Dechaine of National Bank of Canada Equity Research wrote that despite the spectre of setting aside reserves to deal with mortalities, Manulife ended the year on a strong note.

Although we are generally averse to corporate buzzwords, (Sun Life’s fourth quarter) was emblematic of the company’s ‘resilient business mix.’ That is, despite weaker than normal investment performance … the company delivered a solid earnings beat,” wrote Dechaine in a client note.

Anita Balakrishnan, The Canadian Press


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