In a virtual meeting with Forest Minister Doug Donaldson, Gold River council has asked for a share of stumpage fees. (Black Press files)

Gold River council asks B.C. to provide stumpage contribution to small communities

The revenue will help smaller communities pay for aging infrastructure and new economic development says Gold River mayor

Gold River is asking for a share of the stumpage fees that the province receives from forest operators when they harvest, buy or sell trees from Crown land.

In a virtual meeting with Forest Minister Doug Donaldson last month, Gold River’s council asked the province to address the need for direct stumpage contribution to Gold River and similar small communities.

“The village sees large dollar figures paid into stumpage fees, however, it does not see any direct injection of support from those dollars collected,” said Mayor Brad Unger.

The council told Donaldson that small rural communities have a limited capacity and “struggle to find new revenue sources” to support the aging infrastructure, new economic development and tourism ideas.

“Council was very clear with minister Donaldson that if the rhetoric of small resource communities is, in fact, the backbone of the province, then it was time to prove it by giving the village their fair share,” said Unger.

Unger said that the council has discussed the cost of stumpage fees in Gold River every time the opportunity presents itself. “We get the same response, ‘costs are the same throughout the Province’. But we have argued that it costs more on the West Coast to bring the logs to market, than it does in other areas of B.C.”

The council also told the forest ministry about Western Forest Products’ decision to change operations, and essentially contract all the works outside of Gold River.

Mayor Unger said that Donaldson and his team were unaware of the events that had unfolded and stated he would provide staff resources from his ministry to the village administration for assistance and further review.

READ ALSO: Lumber hitting record-high prices as supply lags behind demand

READ ALSO:Vancouver Island couple’s sheep farm dream disrupted by high lumber price

forestryGold River

Just Posted

(pixabay photo)
Bakker: Feeling alone after a miscarriage

October is National Pregnancy and Infant Loss Remembrance Month

Dylan Hillis preparing collagen samples from ancient dog bones at the UBC musuem of Anthropology. Photo: Eric Guiry
Ancient ‘woolly dog’ ate mostly fish, new University of Victoria study finds

Study gives researchers better understanding of human-dog relationships on Tsehaht First Nation

Mary Fox’s new book My Life as a Potter is available at bookstores nationwide. (Cole Schisler photo)
My Life as a Potter raises funds for Mary Fox Legacy Project

Acclaimed Vancovuer Island potter’s story raising money for developing artists

L to R - Westshore Towing owner dave LeQuesne and Peninsula Towing owners Meghan and Don Affleck believe the cost of dealing with abandoned vehicles, boats, Rvs and campers is a significant financial burden. (Rick Stiebel/News Staff)
Towing the line: Vancouver Island tow truck operators at a loss with abandoned vehicles

Dealing with derelict boats, RVs, trailers, vehicles adds up to thousands in uncompensated costs

Lyric John-Cliffe and Cory Cliffe sing a traditional Laichkwiltach canoe song by the Campbell River Estuary. Photo by Binny Paul/Campbell River Mirror
Learning the land: restoration and education collide on the Campbell River estuary

Wei Wai Kum First Nation project passing the baton of environmental stewardship to seven generations

B.C. provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry gives a daily briefing on COVID-19 cases at an almost empty B.C. Legislature press theatre in Victoria, B.C., on March 25, 2020. (Don Craig/B.C. government)
B.C. sees 223 new COVID-19 cases, now 2,009 active

Two new care home outbreaks in Surrey, Burnaby

Conservation officers hope the public can provide information about who shot and left a bull and cow Roosevelt elk near Spruston Road, south of Nanaimo. (Facebook photo)
Pair of Roosevelt elk shot and left in woods south of Nanaimo

Conservation officers hope public can help find who killed the animals near Spruston Road

Canada’s Chief Public Health Officer Theresa Tam responds to a question during a news conference Friday October 23, 2020 in Ottawa. Canada’s top physician says she fears the number of COVID-19 hospitalizations and deaths may increase in the coming weeks as the second wave continues to drive the death toll toward 10,000. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Canada’s top doctor warns severe illness likely to rise, trailing spike in COVID-19 cases

Average daily deaths from virus reached 23 over the past seven days, up from six deaths six weeks ago

An artists rendering of the proposed Aragon Properties development in Sooke’s town centre shows a friendly, walkable neighbourhood. (Contributed graphic)
Large housing development eyed for Sooke core

Aragon Properties seeks to build 132 housing units

The Capital Regional District spent $1.7 million to restore the Todd Creek Trestle. (Sooke News Mirror)
Todd Creek Trestle restoration completed

Restoration work adds 35 to 50 years to life span of former rail span near Sooke

Bill Kelly, general manager at Crown Isle Resort & Golf Community, has been named executive professional of the year by the PGA of BC. Scott Stanfield photo
Courtenay golf course, general manager earn PGA of BC awards

Crown Isle’s manager, facility honoured by the industry

Dinner shows in the Playbill Dining Room are keeping the Chemainus Theatre going during the pandemic. (Photo by Don Bodger)
Dinner events satisfying for the Chemainus Theatre and patrons

Small groups enjoy entertainment and the food in the Playbill Dining Room

100 Mile Conservation officer Joel Kline gingerly holds an injured but very much alive bald eagle after extracting him from a motorist’s minivan. (Photo submitted)
B.C. driver thought he retrieved a dead bald eagle – until it came to life in his backseat

The driver believed the bird to be dead and not unconscious as it turned out to be

Most Read