B.C. youth develop life-saving app to assist in overdose emergencies

B.C. youth develop life-saving app to assist in overdose emergencies

Android-friendly app designed for teens developed with help of health authority, paramedics

A potentially life-saving app has been created by a group of Chilliwack teens, with the help of Fraser Health and B.C. Paramedics.

OD Hero, available now for Android devices only, can walk anyone through an overdose situation or alcohol poisoning, even if they’re not in WiFi range. The app has been in development for more than a year, through a now-unfunded program called VOYCE Youth.

The impetus for the app came out of a local event where the discussion turned to resuscitation, and how sometimes youth will be faced with an overdose or over-drinking scenario away from cellphone or WiFi service. The group’s facilitator at the time, Vincent Giesbrecht, knew this, because he had just been in that very situation.

“I told a story about a party I had gone to, about two weeks prior,” he says, back in the winter of 2016. “This boy had asthma, he drank vodka and had an asthma attack. It was not good, he was not responding.”

Things continued to go wrong.

“The most alarming thing about it was his friends didn’t know what to do,” Giesbrecht recalls. “There was a crowd of about 20 totally smothering him. They were slapping him awake, arguing about whether they should put him on back, or his side. They even tried to stand him up.”

The reasons things got so out of hand are common, he said. Nobody wants to be the one to call 911; nobody wants to be the one to be in trouble.

“Nobody wanted to take him to the hospital,” he said. It wasn’t until the DJ at the party stopped the music that they got the teen the help he needed.

But here’s the thing that a lot of teenagers and drug users alike don’t know. They won’t get in trouble. And the OD Hero tells the app user exactly what to expect in these types of scenarios. There is a Good Samaritan Drug Overdose Act, providing protection for those who call 911 and administer first aid to someone overdosing.

The app explains, for example, that if you are using with someone and they overdose, neither of you will be charged for possession.

That call can mean the difference between life and death. But the app also helps improve the situation for people who are offline — something that can often happen in the summer with bush parties, or with teens who may not have roaming data.

OD Hero uses clear, concise images, descriptions and instructions for overdose first aid basics, like how to place someone in recovery position. And it’s information that is going to be useful to more than just heavy partiers or drug users.

“At first when we started to develop the app, people would say to us, ‘well we’re not drug users, we don’t need this,’” Giesbrecht says. But in the wake of the current opioid crisis, they firmly believe that being able to help in an overdose situation is everyone’s concern.

READ: Parents call for change to health laws after Victoria teen’s death

“Even if you’re not part of the party scene it can useful,” he says. “Even just walking by someone on the sidewalk, you can now have the resource to use at any time. We wanted to make it easy.”

While VOYCE Youth was once a funded program, that funding ran out last year in the middle of development. The group decided to push ahead with the app because, they argued, it was that important.

Maggie Aronoff (in Mission) was the Local Action Team Coordinator from the Chilliwack Division of Family Practice (working under the Child & Youth Mental Health & Substance Use Collaborative – temporary funding) who finished the project with the youth, published the app and helped the youth promote.

“This is something they came up with,” she says of the youth involved. “It didn’t cost much of anything, because we had adults helping and youth driving the project. Adam Shelley did all of the program. He donated, I don’t know many hours.”

Cherie Martens (in Maple Ridge) was the Youth Adult Partnership Coordinator who initially helped the youth and sought out all the expert opinions from Fraser Health, College of Paramedics, RCMP, and others, and recruited a volunteer programmer. Haley Hodgkinson and Aaron Cusson joined on as Youth Coordinators after Giesbrecht graduated. Other key youth involved in the project include Eric MacAulay and Marina Heath.

The app finally launched on April 23 on Google Play. That cost about $125, and it would cost about that to have the app added to iTunes, to be compatible with iPhones.

“At this point, the group has no budget,” Aronoff says. They are working on finding another sponsor for the app, and the group continues to meet, although their meetings are virtual now instead of in person. They are continuing to work on events and causes that are important to them, including an upcoming alternative prom celebration that will be open to more people than the strict rules in place through the Chilliwack school district.

They’re also working on getting the word out about the app, without having funding for advertising or a connected organization to do that for them. The Chilliwack Division of Family Practice has promoted the app on social media, and the group members are sharing the info through word of mouth.

To download the OD Hero app through Google Play, search for OD Hero. To contact Aronoff, email ChilliwackVOYCE@gmail.com.


@CHWKcommunity
jpeters@theprogress.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Al Kohut, owner of the new photographers GALLERY, checks out Looking Back by David Bradt. The photo printed on canvas is among 50 images featured in the Birds on the Wild Side exhibition showing until July 3. (Wolf Depner/News Staff)
Photo gallery in Sidney plucks out top bird photos

Birds on the Wild Side show running at the new photographers GALLERY until July 3

A bathtub kitchen garden is part of the lineup for this year’s Teeny Tiny Garden Tour to benefit Victoria Hospice. (Screenshot/Teeny Tiny Garden Tour)
Virtual garden tour for Victoria Hospice features trio of back yards

Online tour is free; calendar purchase and donation options raise money for the cause

The Town of Sidney supports efforts to rename Reay Creek to KELSET, its traditional SENCOTEN name. (Black Press Media file photo)
Town of Sidney signs off on Reay Creek name change to KELSET

Name change does not affect surrounding parkland, but public supports doing so

Google Maps shows significant traffic backups after a crash reported shortly before noon on Father’s Day, June 20. (Google Maps)
Saanich crash closes lane of McKenzie Avenue

Police say there were injuries, traffic is impacted

Hot rods, rad rods, muscle and sports cars spanning the decades made their way in a parade from North Saanich to Victoria on June 19. (Kiernan Green/News Staff)
PHOTOS: Classic cars cruise Saanich Peninsula in advance of Father’s Day

Retirement home residents from North Saanich to Victoria treated to a spectacle of hot rides

Jesse Roper tackles weeds in his garden to kick off the 2021 season of What’s In My Garden Man? (YouTube/Whats In My Garden)
VIDEO: Metchosin singer-songwriter Jesse Roper invites gardeners into his plot

What’s In My Garden, Man? kicks off with the poop on compost

RCMP crest. (Black Press Media files)
Fort St. John man arrested after allegedly inviting sexual touching from children

Two children reported the incident to a trusted adult right away

A Lotto 6/49 ticket purchased in Parksville for the June 19, 2021 draw is a $3M winner. (Submitted photo)
Winning Lotto 6/49 ticket worth $3M purchased on Vancouver Island

Lottery prize winners have 52 weeks to claim jackpot

Barbara Violo, pharmacist and owner of The Junction Chemist Pharmacy, draws up a dose behind vials of both Pfizer-BioNTech and Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccines on the counter, in Toronto, Friday, June 18, 2021. An independent vaccine tracker website founded by a University of Saskatchewan student says just over 20 per cent of eligible Canadians — those 12 years old and above — are now fully vaccinated. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
At least 20% of eligible Canadians fully vaccinated, 75% with one dose: data

Earlier projections for reopening at this milestone didn’t include Delta variant

This undated file photo provided by Ernie Carswell & Partners shows the home featured in the opening and closing scenes of The Brady Bunch in Los Angeles. Do you know the occupation of Mike Brady, the father in this show about a blended family? (Anthony Barcelo/Ernie Carswell & Partners via AP, File)
QUIZ: A celebration of dad on Father’s Day

How much do you know about famous fathers?

Emily Steele holds up a collage of her son, 16-year-old Elijah-Iain Beauregard who was stabbed and killed in June 2019, outside of Kelowna Law Courts on June 18. (Aaron Hemens/Capital News)
Kelowna woman who fatally stabbed teen facing up to 1.5 years of jail time

Her jail sentence would be followed by an additional one to 1.5 years of supervision

The George Road wildfire near Lytton, B.C., has grown to 250 hectares. (BC Wildfire Service)
B.C. drone sighting halts helicopters fighting 250 hectares of wildfire

‘If a drone collides with firefighting aircraft the consequences could be deadly,’ says BC Wildfire Service

A dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine is pictured at a vaccination site in Vancouver Thursday, March 11, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
NACI advice to mix vaccines gets varied reaction from AstraZeneca double-dosers

NACI recommends an mRNA vaccine for all Canadians receiving a second dose of a COVID-19 vaccine

A aerial view shows the debris going into Quesnel Lake caused by a tailings pond breach near the town of Likely, B.C., Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Updated tailings code after Mount Polley an improvement: B.C. mines auditor

British Columbia’s chief auditor of mines has found changes to the province’s requirements for tailings storage facilities

Most Read