Ever wonder what ‘free parking’ is going to cost you?

On-street parking spot along Victoria bikeway estimated at $21,441 each, based on land value

What’s the price of an on-street parking spot?

It isn’t free, and the answer is a lot higher than one might think.

One estimation, based on neighbouring land values, puts the cost of an on-street parking spot (measured at 167 square-feet, as according to City of Victoria parking minimums for a standard, square spot) between Foul Bay Road and Runnymede-Redfern at $21,441 (see explanation at bottom of story).

And yet, on-street parking is a right that many residents feel entitled to. The problem is, it’s a heavily subsidized use of public space based on a car-centric culture and causes all sorts of problems. One of those is the City of Victoria’s attempt to build a safe bikeway network, says Fairfield resident Lorne Daniel.

READ MORE: Victoria unveils next phase of bike lane network

The City hasn’t declared parking as an issue and in most cases, Victoria retains on-street parking in their bikeway upgrades. However, roads should be re-evaluated for moving people, not just driving and parking, Daniel said.

Currently, Victoria is being criticized for two legs of its 2020 phase of the bikeway network, Richardson and Haultain roads. Haultain is narrow and the on-street parking makes it particularly dangerous.

“The point is, there isn’t any free parking,” Daniel said. “And the [current] Richardson proposal is not an AAA [all ages and abilities] design. Really, it’s just because they’re fearful of the backlash of drivers.”

The question for Oak Bay, Daniel says, is why doesn’t McNeil have bike lanes that will link up with Richardson. Oak Bay has hundreds of commuters who bike into Victoria and McNeil has all kinds of space. Oak Bay could easily install a protected bike lane on McNeil, Daniel said, and without any loss of parking.

In the 2016 census, 16.1 per cent of commuters from South Oak Bay reported traveling by bike. That number doubled from 8.6 in the 10 years previous.

READ ALSO: Victoria cycling community raises concern over new bike lane designs

“It’s something that should be done, especially if Victoria is going to discourage drivers from OB onto Richardson,” Daniel said.

The proposal for Richardson, as has been widely reported, is to minimize the number of drivers on it by adding traffic diverters. The main diversion is to block westbound access at Foul Bay Road. Oak Bay drivers – at least a few – don’t like it and fear they’ll be trapped behind their own Tweed Curtain.

However, Richardson is a residential road and wasn’t built as a highway for Oak Bay residents to travel downtown, Daniel points out.

“I’ve had one person tell me, ‘You want me to drive on Fairfield instead and travel through three school zones,’” Daniel said. “I said, ‘Yes, or you don’t have to drive.’ There’s a lot of people in Fairfield who don’t believe our roads are here for Oak Bay residents to commute on.’”

For the record, the Greater Victoria Cycling Coalition is highly concerned with the Richardson advisory bike lanes, but are not focused on the on-street parking along Richardson.

“We just don’t know enough about advisory bike lanes, or if they will work here,” said Corey Burger of GVCC. “The City of Victoria should let Humboldt advisory bike lane get built and tested before adding more.”

So how much is a parking spot? Or how about the whole road? (For those reading our print edition, visit this story online at oakbaynews.com to see our crack-shot methodology.)

Just for fun, here is rudimentary speculation based on a simple equation. The math was done using B.C. Assessment to collect the land values.

Yes, it’s a crude way to go about it with many errors. However, if the road on a city block was converted back into a residential lot, speculation suggests it would cost the same and the property might increase in value. Therefore, it works well enough as an exercise.

Parking spaces generally range in size from about 270 to 320 sq. ft. To make it easy, we’ll go with 300 sq. ft. Multiply that by the number of cars regularly parked on the street.

We took all 10 lots facing Richardson between Foul Bay Road and the intersection of Runnymede (and the alley which turns into Redfern), where westbound traffic will be minimized by the proposed Foul Bay diversion. The land value of all 10 lots is $7,981,000, divided by the estimated 62,161 square feet, is $128.39 per square foot. That number times 167 sq. ft. equals $21,441.13.

reporter@oakbaynews.com

Just Posted

Dylan Hillis preparing collagen samples from ancient dog bones at the UBC musuem of Anthropology. Photo: Eric Guiry
Ancient ‘woolly dog’ ate mostly fish, new University of Victoria study finds

Study gives researchers better understanding of human-dog relationships on Tsehaht First Nation

Mary Fox’s new book My Life as a Potter is available at bookstores nationwide. (Cole Schisler photo)
My Life as a Potter raises funds for Mary Fox Legacy Project

Acclaimed Vancovuer Island potter’s story raising money for developing artists

L to R - Westshore Towing owner dave LeQuesne and Peninsula Towing owners Meghan and Don Affleck believe the cost of dealing with abandoned vehicles, boats, Rvs and campers is a significant financial burden. (Rick Stiebel/News Staff)
Towing the line: Vancouver Island tow truck operators at a loss with abandoned vehicles

Dealing with derelict boats, RVs, trailers, vehicles adds up to thousands in uncompensated costs

Lyric John-Cliffe and Cory Cliffe sing a traditional Laichkwiltach canoe song by the Campbell River Estuary. Photo by Binny Paul/Campbell River Mirror
Learning the land: restoration and education collide on the Campbell River estuary

Wei Wai Kum First Nation project passing the baton of environmental stewardship to seven generations

Comox Valley Unhoused executive director Sam Franey, right, is pictured at the Comox Valley Art Gallery with Jagmeet Singh, leader of Canada’s New Democratic Party, and Ronna-Rae Leonard, BC NDP candidate for the Courtenay—Comox riding. Scott Stanfield photo
Housing, for the unhoused, by the unhoused

Comox Valley man dedicated to battling homelessness after spending five years on the streets

B.C. provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry gives a daily briefing on COVID-19 cases at an almost empty B.C. Legislature press theatre in Victoria, B.C., on March 25, 2020. (Don Craig/B.C. government)
B.C. sees 223 new COVID-19 cases, now 2,009 active

Two new care home outbreaks in Surrey, Burnaby

Conservation officers hope the public can provide information about who shot and left a bull and cow Roosevelt elk near Spruston Road, south of Nanaimo. (Facebook photo)
Pair of Roosevelt elk shot and left in woods south of Nanaimo

Conservation officers hope public can help find who killed the animals near Spruston Road

An artists rendering of the proposed Aragon Properties development in Sooke’s town centre shows a friendly, walkable neighbourhood. (Contributed graphic)
Large housing development eyed for Sooke core

Aragon Properties seeks to build 132 housing units

The Capital Regional District spent $1.7 million to restore the Todd Creek Trestle. (Sooke News Mirror)
Todd Creek Trestle restoration completed

Restoration work adds 35 to 50 years to life span of former rail span near Sooke

Bill Kelly, general manager at Crown Isle Resort & Golf Community, has been named executive professional of the year by the PGA of BC. Scott Stanfield photo
Courtenay golf course, general manager earn PGA of BC awards

Crown Isle’s manager, facility honoured by the industry

Dinner shows in the Playbill Dining Room are keeping the Chemainus Theatre going during the pandemic. (Photo by Don Bodger)
Dinner events satisfying for the Chemainus Theatre and patrons

Small groups enjoy entertainment and the food in the Playbill Dining Room

100 Mile Conservation officer Joel Kline gingerly holds an injured but very much alive bald eagle after extracting him from a motorist’s minivan. (Photo submitted)
B.C. driver thought he retrieved a dead bald eagle – until it came to life in his backseat

The driver believed the bird to be dead and not unconscious as it turned out to be

Chastity Davis-Alphonse took the time to vote on Oct. 21. B.C’s general Election Day is Saturday, Oct. 24. (Chastity Davis-Alphonse Facebook photo)
B.C. reconciliation advocate encourages Indigenous women to vote in provincial election

Through the power of voice and education Chastity Davis-Alphonse is hopeful for change

Most Read