Canada slips in global corruption ranking in aftermath of SNC-Lavalin scandal

The country obtained a score of 77, which places it at the top in the Americas

Canada has slipped in the annual Transparency International ranking of countries considered among the least corrupt, in light of the SNC-Lavalin controversy.

According to the Berlin-based organization’s most recent corruption perception index, Canada now ranks 12th on the list of 180 countries assessed, behind Germany, the Netherlands and Norway. This is a decrease of three places compared to 2018.

The country obtained a score of 77, which places it at the top in the Americas, while the United States ranks 23rd.

The report points out that the ”shockingly low” enforcement of foreign bribery laws among economically developed countries was reflected in the case against SNC-Lavalin, which faced criminal charges of fraud and corruption in Libya between 2001 and 2011.

READ MORE: New SNC-Lavalin CEO says plea deal unlikely despite Liberal election win

The Montreal engineering company settled the charges in December, with its construction division pleading guilty to a single count of fraud and agreeing to a $280-million fine to be paid over five years and a three-year probation order.

Transparency International also says that Canada is becoming an increasingly popular place for money laundering or “snow-washing” through shell companies to avoid paying taxes.

Denmark and New Zealand are considered the least corrupt countries with a score of 87 points. At the other end of the scale are Somalia, South Sudan and Syria, with scores of nine, 12 and 13.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

SNC-Lavalin

Just Posted

PHOTOS: Iconic aircraft at 19 Wing Comox entrance undergoes facelift

PHOTOS: Iconic aircraft at 19 Wing Comox entrance undergoes facelift

Dragon’s Den auditions return to Victoria in search of business pitches

Auditions take place on March 5 at Parkside Hotel and Spa

Meet the new owner of one of Vancouver Island’s most remote restaurants

Kevin Foley, originally from Regina, Saskatchewan, has bought the Scarlet Ibis Pub & Restaurant

Mitchell’s Musings: Modern language is a work in progress

‘Professional’ communication requires more critical thinking from listeners

T.W. Paterson column: Martial law in Ladysmith and other odds ‘n’ ends and random observations

If, as they say, history occasionally repeats itself, it also does 180-degree turnarounds.

Governor general says multiple solutions needed for ‘complicated’ overdose issue

Julie Payette met at a fire hall with firefighters and police officers as well as politicians and health experts

Violent ends to past Indigenous protests haunt Trudeau government

Trudeau adopted a more assertive tone Friday, insisting the barricade must come down

HIGHLIGHTS: Day one and two at the 2020 BC Winter Games

Athletes had sunny – but cold – weather to work with in Fort St. John

B.C. money laundering inquiry to begin amid hopes for answers, accountability

Eby argued that most B.C. residents already know the previous government, at best, turned a blind eye

Blockades remain in place as Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs returning to B.C.

Hereditary Chief Woos said they are ready to engage in nation-to-nation talks with the B.C.

Tyler Toffoli scores twice, Canucks crush Bruins 9-3

Stecher, Miller each add three points for Vancouver

Zamboni driver, 42, earns NHL win over Maple Leafs

Emergency goalie called into action for Carolina Hurricanes

Court awards Nanaimo woman $300,000 after crash exacerbates her fibromyalgia

Judgment follows 2015 motor vehicle accident on Turner Road

Most Read