E-Comm call-taker Christie Duncan (E-Comm 911)

Wrong nail polish colour tops worst 911 calls of 2017: E-Comm

The emergency communications centre has released the worst 911 calls of the year

E-Comm’s 911 dispatchers are reaching out to the public with their top 10 examples of calls they received in 2017 that unnecessarily tied-up emergency lines.

And the one the tops this year’s list: Calling the emergency line to complain that a nail salon won’t change a nail polish colour.

That call, fielded by Christie Duncan is just one example of the non-emergency calls plaguing B.C.’s largest call centre.

“Spending time on calls like these takes me away from being available to help someone who is a serious emergency situation,” Duncan said.

“And believe it or not, this isn’t the first time I’ve received a call about the colour of nail polish.”

Other 2017 top reasons to not call 911 include:

2. Car refusing to move forward at a gas station pump

3. To report food was inedible and restaurant refusing to provide refund

4. Complaining tenant moved without returning keys

5. Calling because someone parked in their parking spot

6. Wondering if a washroom closed sign at a popular beach was legitimate

7. Complaining gas station wouldn’t accept coins for payment

8. Calling to ask if raccoons are dangerous animals

9. Asking if there’s a law preventing washing clothes at 6 a.m.

10. Calling to check the time following the fall time change

This year’s best-of-the-worst may be laughable, but are more common than you might think, said Jody Robertson, executive director of corporate communications.

“The fact is – every time a 911 call taker handles one of these calls, we waste valuable resources. We’re asking the public to help us help,” Robertson said.

WATCH: One-in-five 911 calls are ‘non-emergencies’: E-Comm

The list follows a new campaign by the emergency communications centre, that found one-in-five calls for police aren’t actually an emergency. The campaign is urging B.C. residents to consider how they may be letting non-emergency calls get in the way of real ones.

E-Comm receives approximately 1.36 million calls every year, and Robertson is reminding the public that 911 is for police, fire or medical emergencies when immediate action is needed and calling non-emergency lines for calls like this is also not appropriate.

Just Posted

Two dead in accident north of Campbell River

Highway closed in both directions

New initiative challenges Islanders: ‘Don’t walk in the hallways’

Hop, skip, dance, sway — anything to keep up your physical literacy skills

House of Hope: Responding to the gaps in care

“They were parking the car in the parkade and they lost sight of me for 10 seconds. Then I jumped.”

Robert Barron: Looking back, I wish I had talked to Terry Fox

I was there for the start of this hero’s journey, never expecting the icon he became

VIDEO: Vancouver Island mayor details emergency response after fatal bus crash

Sharie Minions says she is ‘appalled’ by condition of road where bus crashed

Federal party leaders address gun violence after weekend shooting near Toronto

One teen was killed and five people injured in the shooting

Conservatives promise tax cut that they say will address Liberal increases

Scheer says the cut would apply to the lowest income bracket

B.C. VIEWS: Cutting wood waste produces some bleeding

Value-added industry slowly grows as big sawmills close

Fewer trees, higher costs blamed for devastating downturn in B.C. forestry

Some say the high cost of logs is the major cause of the industry’s decline in B.C.

Federal food safety watchdog says batch of baby formula recalled

The agency says it’s conducting a food safety investigation

Coming Home: B.C. fire chief and disaster dog return from hurricane-ravaged Bahamas

The pair spent roughly one week on Great Abaco Island assisting in relief efforts

Newcomer Ferland lines up with sniper Pettersson as Vancouver Canucks camp opens

Ferland provides more depth and a scoring threat up front, Pettersson says

Most Read