With winter months drawing closer, BC RCMP Traffic Services are reminding drivers to be prepared, and drive safely. (Pixabay)

Be prepared and drive safely, say BC RCMP as winter draws closer

Police provide list of ways to stay safe while driving in winter conditions

With winter months drawing closer, BC RCMP Traffic Services are reminding drivers to be prepared, and drive safely.

Every year, about 38 people die in B.C. in collisions where vehicles were bring drive too fast for conditions, according to RCMP.

This has resulted in October being named Drive to Conditions month. With this, police will be out in force stopping drivers and checking vehicles to ensure they are properly equipped for winter.

READ MORE: Winter tires, chains now mandatory along most B.C. highways

Here’s a list of ways you can stay safe while driving:

  1. Replace windshield wipers to improve visibility and clear all windows of fog/ice and snow before driving;
  2. Clean your vehicle’s windows in and out, use air conditioning at a comfortable temperature so windows don’t fog up, and consider applying products to the exterior glass that repels water to improve visibility;
  3. Check your tires to ensure they are in good condition, have sufficient tread depth and are properly inflated. Winter tread (including M&S tires) are required in B.C. between October 1 and April 30 (For select highways not located through mountain passes and/or high snowfall areas, tire and chain requirements end March 31);
  4. Turn your headlights to the “ON” position – this ensures your tail lights come on as well so you can be seen from behind. Make sure all your lights, signals and brake lights are fully functional;
  5. Do not use cruise control on wet, snowy or slippery road surfaces;
  6. Increase the distance between you and vehicles ahead to give yourself more time to stop, especially if it is raining, snowing, slippery, foggy or night time;
  7. Slow down especially if it is raining, snowing, or foggy, or any other time your visibility is limited. Posted speed limits assume ideal driving conditions;
  8. Be extra vigilant for cyclists and pedestrians who may be unpredictable and not clearly visible;
  9. Watch out for “black ice” as temperatures drop to freezing; and
  10. Give yourself extra time to get to your destination.

This list was provided by RCMP in an effort to keep people safe during their travels.

“Ultimately, we want to minimize collisions, injuries and fatalities on our roadways in our ongoing effort to make our roadways safer for all road users,” said RCMP Supt. Holly Turton, Officer in Charge of BC RCMP Traffic Services.

READ MORE: Morning Start: California wildfires consume area larger than half of Vancouver Island

Do you have something to add to this story, or something else we should report on? Email: phil.mclachlan@kelownacapnews.com


 

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