FILE - In this Jan. 7, 2020, file photo, Britain’s Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex leave Canada House in London. Six months after detangling their work lives from the British royal family, the couple have signed a multiyear deal with Netflix. According to a statement Wednesday, they plan to produce nature series, documentaries and children’s programming through a new production company. The two recently relocated to Santa Barbara, California, with baby Archie. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein, File)

Prince Harry and Meghan sign production deal with Netflix

Prince Harry and Meghan have signed a deal to produce nature series, documentaries and children’s programming

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex have a new home: Netflix.

Six months after detangling their work lives from the British royal family, Prince Harry and his wife, Meghan, have signed a multiyear deal to produce nature series, documentaries and children’s programming for the streamer, according to a statement Wednesday.

The two, who recently relocated to Santa Barbara, California, plan to focus on stories and issues that elevate diverse voices and other issues close to their hearts. Several projects are already in development, including a nature docu-series and a series focused on women who inspire.

“Our lives, both independent of each other and as a couple, have allowed us to understand the power of the human spirit: of courage, resilience, and the need for connection,” the pair said in the joint statement. ”Through our work with diverse communities and their environments, to shining a light on people and causes around the world, our focus will be on creating content that informs but also gives hope.”

The couple also pledged to promote diversity behind the camera as their production company gets off the ground. Meghan has said she will not return to acting. She has done some voice work since the couple left the U.K. with baby Archie in search of their financial independence.

The prince worked closely with the filmmakers of the documentary “Rising Phoenix,” in which he also appears. It premiered last week on Netflix.

Ted Sarandos, co-CEO and chief content officer for Netflix, said in the statement that the decamped royals have “inspired millions of people all around the world with their authenticity, optimism and leadership.”

He said the company is proud they have made Netflix their creative home and looks forward to “telling stories with them that can help build resilience and increase understanding for audiences everywhere.”

READ MORE: Policing costs for Meghan Markle, Prince Harry’s B.C. stay topped $50K: taxpayers group

The Associated Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Want to support local journalism during the pandemic? Make a donation here.

Arts and EntertainmentRoyal family

Just Posted

First year University of Victoria students face a vastly different ‘university experience’

First years at UVic are feeling frustrated with online classes and virtual friendships

Island Sexual Health expanding physical space and workforce

Island Health looking to hire more health care workers for centre once expansion complete

Editorial: Tiny houses should be a real option on the Island

We are missing the boat by not enabling the building of tiny houses

‘Every day is a new feeling’: Jackie Bates adjusts to her new life, and new lungs

Ladysmith woman’s life has changed for the better since receiving a double lung transplant on July 15

How the pandemic ushered in a marketing evolution at a B.C. aquaculture firm

For Grieg Seafood BC it meant pivoting fish to parallel markets without halting production

Quirky Canadian comedy ‘Schitt’s Creek’ takes Emmys by storm with comedy sweep

Toronto-raised Daniel Levy and Ottawa-born Annie Murphy both got supporting actor nods

B.C. unveils new cannabis sales programs to help small, Indigenous growers

Government did not say how it will define small producers, but says nurseries will be included in the policy

Tiny homes could help Cowichan’s housing issues, says housing official

John Horn says homeless need shelter with winter coming

Campbell River to get new $14-million library

Costs shared by regional library jurisdictions, not paid for by Campbell River taxpayers alone

Qualicum Beach seek funds for $4.5M community field project

Turf surface would allow for new sporting activities

Three Nanaimo-area writers up for CBC non-fiction prize

Sheila Brooke, Vicki McLeod and Rachael Preston make 35-person longlist

B.C. transportation minister will not seek re-election

Claire Trevena has held the position since 2017

B.C. migrant, undocumented workers rally for permanent residency program

Rally is part of the Amnesty for Undocumented Workers Campaign led by the Migrant Workers Centre

Most Read