A photo taken by the Indian army showing mysterious footprints they say belong to the Yeti. (AFP photo)

Do fantastic beasts lurk in the uncharted depths of Vancouver Island?

Indian army ‘yeti’ photos reignite debate: Could monsters in traditional folklore stories be real?

Is Bigfoot real and living in a ravine in the remote reaches of Strathcona Park?

Does a scaly, horse-headed creature lurk in the deep waters of Georgia Strait off the Saanich Peninsula?

Members of the Indian Army recently reignited the debate of whether “mythical” creatures actually exist, by posting photos online they claim proves the existence of the Abominable Snowman.

The army said they found Yeti footprints in the snow close to Makalu Base Camp in the Himlalayas on April 9. They held on to the “photographic evidence” while they conducted further research, before tweeting them Tuesday, saying they have now been passed on for expert verification.

The soldiers who made the discovery are part of the Indian Army’s elite Mountaineering Expedition Team and claim they found a series of footprints measuring 32 x 15 inches (81 x 38 cm) that were spaced out at intervals of over a metre.

The Yeti has previously been dismissed as a myth originating in the Himalayas and animal parts, sightings, footprints and other “evidence” crops up every few years purporting to prove its existence, often as far away as Russia.

Communities around the world have traditional stories of mystical creatures and while most have been confined to the annals of history or the pages of folklore books, some beasts have caught the public imagination enough that “sightings” continue to the present day.

From the Loch Ness monster in Scotland to the Sasquatch in North America, tall stories, theories and shaky video clips persist, trying to prove the plausibility of the monsters’ existences.

ALSO READ: Necropsy of grey whale rules out plastic poisoning

Sometimes a “Yeti bone” turns out to be a human finger, as in 2011, or a sea monster sighting is proven to be a bloated whale carcass.

Other times however, creatures already known to science grow to a prolifically unusual size that fools witnesses into thinking they saw a monster. The long running Animal Planet TV show River Monsters has spent 10 seasons investigating local mythology and then trying to catch the creatures described, often finding prodigiously big creatures of known species such as a 150 pound Amazonian Arapaima fish, over 7 feet in length, or a 400 pound stingray in Borneo.

B.C. is no different in having its own imaginative stories, such as the Cadborosaurus, a creature said to have a long horse-like head, flippers and the body of a serpent. “Caddy” as it is affectionately known, has been the subject of numerous sightings in Cadboro Bay down the years, with the indigenous Alaskan Manhousat people saying it is actually their local creature, hiyitl’iik, who annually migrates to B.C. waters.

ALSO READ: Coroners use new tool to crack mystery of the floating feet in the Salish Sea

Another traditional creature is Stin’qua, a serpent-like monster thought to reside in the depths of Cowichan Lake. A 1930 issue of the Cowichan Leader reported a sighting, by local man Cougar Charlie, who described it as huge and “whitish.” Other sightings over the last 120 years have described a 30 foot long creature snaking through the water, with fish leaping above the surface to avoid it.

Cryptozoologists wait with bated breath for the further analysis of whether the Yeti is perhaps real.

Anyone interested in learning more about mystical native beasts can visit bcscc.ca home to Canada’s Cryptozoology Organization.



nick.murray@peninsulanewsreview.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Vancouver Island’s longest, steepest, zip line nears completion

Mount Washington aims to thrill with 2.3-km drop reaching speeds approaching100 km/hr

Teen viral video star headlining first concert in hometown Nanaimo

Lauren Spencer-Smith, 15, has been recording new songs with Grammy-winning producer

The road to ruin: dealing with Vancouver Island’s dirty little trash secret

Ongoing illegal dumping problem near Ladysmith symbolic of a bigger issue

Editorial: It’s hard to believe people still drink and drive

People cannot claim ignorance, or lack of options, it’s laziness and stupidity, pure and simple

Vehicle towed from ocean following dramatic rescue south of Campbell River

Driver survives plunge after losing control on the highway

Fashion Fridays: 5 casual summer dress styles

Kim XO, helps to keep you looking good on Fashion Fridays on the Black Press Media Network

Couple found dead along northern B.C. highway in double homicide

Woman from the U.S. and man from Australia found dead near Liard Hot Springs

B.C. man pleads guilty in snake venom death of toddler

Plea comes more than five years after the incident in North Vancouver

Trudeau says Ottawa open to proposals for B.C. refinery as gas prices soar

Prime minister says he knows B.C. residents are struggling and the federal government is open to ideas

Clock’s ticking to share how you feel about Daylight Saving Time in B.C.

Provincial public survey ends at 4 p.m. on Friday

Trudeau in Victoria to announce $79M investment in public transit

Contributions from municipal to federal level to fund 118 more buses across B.C. to cut commutes

B.C. First Nation’s group using ads in Texas targeting company for fuel spill

The Heiltsuk Tribal Council has called out Kirby Corporation for the Nathan E. Stewart oil spill

B.C. woman wins record $2.1 million on casino slot machine

‘That night was so surreal … I wasn’t able to sleep or eat for the first two days,’ she said

$900M settlement reached in class action on sexual misconduct in Canadian military

After facing criticism, the government moved to begin settlement proceedings in early 2018

Most Read