80-tonne float home makes its way to Fisherman’s Wharf from Sooke

The float home journeys for six to eight hours to its new destination

People may have been surprised while looking out at the Strait of Juan de Fuca this week.

An 80-tonne float home named Asgaard was towed from a marine facility in Sooke to its new home at Fisherman’s Wharf.

Asgaard is a custom-designed, two-storey building and is the first float home to sail into Fisherman’s Wharf since a group of floating homes arrived from Westbay Marine Village in Esquimalt two decades ago.

READ ALSO: 2.8 million pounds of seafood, 640,000 cruise ship passengers pass through Victoria’s harbour

“Float homes aren’t boats, they’re meant to stay in one spot so a trip of 20 nautical miles on open water is definitely a rare event,” said David Leff, the Fisherman’s Wharf resident who designed and constructed Asgaard with his son, Jason Leff.

Once the float home arrived at its new destination it would have to be carefully moved into place on Dock A, Leff said prior to the journey. The home will need to be guided between two rows of float homes and positioned alongside the dock.

“It’s a pretty sizable structure, so everyone involved in this will be holding their breath until it’s securely moored,” Leff said.

The move, which requires very calm conditions, is expected to take six to eight hours and is subject to precise guidelines.

Depending on the winds in the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Asgaard was expected to arrive on Wednesday morning after an overnight journey.

READ ALSO: HOMEFINDER: Float homes can offer relaxing lifestyle on the water

The float home is named Asgaard after the heavenly home of Norse gods. It is 33 feet long, 24 feet wide and 24.5 feet high.

The vessel’s concrete, foam-filled base was designed and cast by Surefloat in Duncan. The base was built in two pieces, trucked to a marine facility in Sooke, placed into the water by the largest mobile crane on Vancouver Island, and joined together with 24-foot-long steel rods.

The second-floor living space is 16 feet high with curved laminated beams built in Penticton.

shalu.mehta@goldstreamgazette.com


 

vnc.editorial@blackpress.ca

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