Larry Ferguson of Sidney looks inside Sidney’s Truth + Alibi Cannabis Co. The business formerly known as Happy Buddha Cannabis plans to ‘open very soon,’ something Ferguson welcomes. (Wolf Depner/News Staff)

Larry Ferguson of Sidney looks inside Sidney’s Truth + Alibi Cannabis Co. The business formerly known as Happy Buddha Cannabis plans to ‘open very soon,’ something Ferguson welcomes. (Wolf Depner/News Staff)

Sidney business formerly known as Happy Buddha Cannabis bears new name

Business now known as Truth + Alibi Cannabis Co. plans to ‘open very soon’

Sidney’s first recreational cannabis shop has a new name.

The business once known as Happy Buddha Cannabis now bears the name Truth + Alibi Cannabis Co.

The trio of entrepreneurs behind the business — Cindy Pendergast, her son son Zach and Brad Styles — dropped the original name in late summer as its religious reference drew criticism from members of the public.

RELATED: Sidney entrepreneurs drop Buddha from name of proposed cannabis shop

Pendergast said in an earlier interview that she decided to change the name after hearing from a Thai woman who told her that she had concerns with the name, while wishing her well.

“She had no problem with cannabis either,” said Pendergast. “She said, ‘It’s a sacred name to us’ and we said, as we said in our window, we are here to lift people up. We will never, ever, ever, ever bring people down. So for us, it was a no-brainer. We would never want to hurt anyone.”

Complaints about the name and its eventual change were the latest in a series of twists around the business.

RELATED: Sidney resident lights up proposed cannabis store for being insensitive toward Buddhism

Sidney councillors signalled their support in late September after they had initially rejected its first application, with the central issue being the business’ contravention of the municipality’s requirement for transparent windows along Beacon Avenue.

The Liquor Control and Licensing Branch (LCRB), the provincial agency licensing cannabis retail locations, at the time required opaque windows, a requirement since dropped.

The entrepreneurs later successfully challenged council’s decision in court. It is not yet clear though when the business will open. A sign placed inside the store front thanks would-be customers for their patience.

“We will be open very soon, ” it reads.

The Peninsula News Review has reached out to the business for comment.

RELATED:Sidney council signals support for recreational cannabis store


Do you have a story tip? Email: vnc.editorial@blackpress.ca.

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram, and like us on Facebook.

wolfgang.depner@peninsulanewsreview.com

Just Posted

Seiners fill the waters between Comox and Nanoose Bay during roe herring fishery. file photo, Pacific Wild
Quota debate heats up on the eve of Vancouver Island herring fishery

Industry and conservationists weigh in how much catch should be allowed as DFO decision coming soon

Greater Victoria is defying national and provincial employment trends as the unemployment rate in December dropped to 5.8 per cent. (Black Press Media File)
Dropping unemployment rate in Greater Victoria defies national and provincial picture

Broader trends such as high youth unemployment are solidifying

Metchosin Mayor John Ranns (Black Press Media file photo)
Charity’s plan to flip tax-exempt greenspace to development angers Metchosin mayor

Boys and Girls Club of Greater Victoria tight-lipped on land plans

Editorial: We’re on the right path to address homelessness

Housing first model can only help improve the situation

North Cowichan Mayor Al Siebring has expressed his frustration with harassment of people who have made racist comments online about Cowichan Tribes in the wake of a COVID-19 outbreak in the First Nation. (Citizen file)
Island mayor calls for de-escalation as social media gets uglier in racism fight

“Racism is wrong. But so is this kind of reaction”:

A woman wears a face mask and shield to curb the spread of COVID-19 while walking in North Vancouver, B.C., on Wednesday, January 6, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
536 COVID cases, 7 deaths reported as B.C. find its first case of South African variant

Henry said 69,746 people have received their first dose of the COVID vaccine.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau listens to a question during a news conference outside Rideau cottage in Ottawa, Friday, January 8, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Trudeau says Canada’s COVID vaccine plan on track despite Pfizer cutting back deliveries

Canadian officials says it will still likely receive four million doses by the end of March

Laurie Arbuthnot, owner of Wild Coast Perfumery in Cowichan Bay, poses with some of her products. (Robert Barron/Citizen)
Opening Wild Coast Perfumery a dream come true for Cowichan Bay owner

Only business of its kind on the Island outside Victoria makes natural, plant-based perfumes

Patty Golumbia and Holly Mair, teacher-librarians at South Island Distance Education, have launched a Read Across Canada challenge for their students. (Courtesy of Holly Mair)
Victoria students gobble up books on virtual trek across Canada

Nearly 40 South Island Distance Education students are participating

The Kerry Park Islanders and Peninsula Panthers battle during a Vancouver Island Junior Hockey League game in November 2020. (Kevin Rothbauer/Citizen)
Vancouver Island Junior Hockey League hasn’t given up on season

Games can’t resume until at least February, but league brass still hopeful

The pantomime ‘Snow White and the 5 Dwarfs’ has been cancelled due to COVID-19 restrictions. (Submitted)
Pantomime cancelled in Cowichan due to COVID restrictions

A partnership of the Cowichan Musical Society, the Shawnigan Players, and the Mercury Players.

Alan Davidson was sentenced to almost six years for abusing seven boys in the late 1970s and early 1990s. (Canadian Press file)
Full parole granted to former Mountie, sports coach convicted of sex abuse of boys

Alan Davidson convicted of abusing boys in B.C. and Saskatchewan in late ’70s, early ’90s

The first COVID-19 vaccine arrives in B.C. in temperature-controlled containers, Dec. 13, 2020. (B.C. government)
More vaccine arrives as B.C. struggles with remote COVID-19 cases

Long-term care homes remain focus for public health

Most Read