Permits for yogurt site in Cumberland approved

Tree Island looking to build facility at Bevan Road subdivision

A Vancouver Island yogurt maker is poised to move and expand its operations.

Cumberland council has given the go-ahead for Tree Island Yogurt to develop a site on 3901 Bevan Rd.

At the Sept. 30 meeting, council approved a development permit for the site, as well as a variance permit. The area is located north of the Comox Valley Waste Management Centre.

Tree Island, doing business as Tree Island, is looking to relocate from its current site in the Royston area. The company also hopes to develop a six-site subdivision to provide further industrial land in the community.

Acciano Development issued a statement it will soon complete the purchase of 15 acres of industrial land at the Bevan Road site from Comox Timber Limited. As part of their plan, they had Ecofish Research assess the potential environmental impacts of the site.

The applicants plan to subdivide the site, with Tree Island using one to build a 28,000-square-foot production facility, four times the size of its current production facility with 10 times the capacity.

“We needed a larger site to grow our business in the Comox Valley, and after not finding any appropriate sites in Comox and Courtenay I discovered the bulk of vacant industrial-zoned lands in the region are in Cumberland, along Bevan Road,” Scott DiGuistini, Acciano Development president, said in the statement. “Through many conversations I had during this exploration, I learned there’s pent-up demand for industrial land and buildings in the region.”

The site falls within a development permit area because of environmental considerations. As well, the applicants from Acciano Development are applying for a variance to allow onsite wastewater treatment systems – specifically for septic fields on lots small than one hectare.

RELATED STORY: Courtenay yogurt maker looks to site in neighbouring community

One concern that arose was any effect that development at the site could have on the groundwater system that feeds Morrison Creek.

At the beginning of the meeting, Janet Gemmell, president of the Morrison Creek Streamkeepers, made a presentation to council about the ecosystem in the area and how important the groundwater is, especially the underground springs in the region.

“These springs are the main source of water for Morrison Creek,” she said. “It is a small but extremely productive tributary of the Puntledge River.”

She added that headwater streams are the “lifeblood” of rivers and streams and are fed by perennial springs. Further, she explained, the water supports many important species of fish such as salmon, trout and lamprey.

“We really feel that this groundwater is vital to that creek,” she said.

Coun. Jesse Ketler agreed the Village would like to have water piped through, rather than using groundwater, but the situation represented a “chicken/egg” dilemma; to expand infrastructure to service businesses such as Tree Island, they would need to bring such businesses. She also described the applicants as ones with a low environmental impact.

“I think they’re a good partner for the Village,” she said. “I think long term we will want the infrastructure out there.”



mike.chouinard@comoxvalleyrecord.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Janet Gemmell, president of the Morrison Creek Streamkeepers, makes a presentation to Cumberland council about concerns proposed development at Bevan Road could have on groundwater. Photo by Mike Chouinard

Just Posted

Island company tastes sweet success with sugar kelp

Cascadia Seaweed is experiencing rapid growth after launching six months ago

Dunsmuir Middle School works with students following in-school protest over cell phone policy

Pupil said he wants students to be included in decisions that impact them

Island First Nations councillor says ‘Hereditary chiefs have the ultimate power’

Ahousaht future hereditary chief Jaiden George explains Indigenous governance.

Forestry strike, curtailment had far-reaching impact on Vancouver Island

Island business community buoyed by mediation breakthrough

BC Ferries gets injunction against demonstrations in solidarity with Wet’suwet’en

The preemptive injunction is a ‘last resort in the interest of public safety,’ spokesperson says

VIDEO: Ottawa wants quick, peaceful resolution to pipeline protests, Trudeau says

The protests have manifested themselves as blockades on different rail lines across the country

Canucks acquire forward Tyler Toffoli from Kings in push for playoffs

Vancouver sends Schaller, Madden, pick to L.A.

New highway proposed between Alberta and B.C.

The route would connect Red Deer to Kamloops

Wet’suwet’en and B.C. government have been talking Aboriginal title for a year

Coastal GasLink says it has agreements with all 20 elected First Nations councils along the 670-kilometre route

Trudeau tightlipped on plan to end protests ‘quickly and peacefully’

The prime minister, who cancelled a two-day trip to Barbados this week to deal with the crisis at home

Canadian standards for coronavirus protection to be reviewed, health agency says

The protocols set out how health workers should protect themselves and their patients

Monday marks one-year anniversary of man missing from Langley

42-year-old B.C. man, Searl Smith, was last seen leaving Langley Memorial Hospital on Feb. 17, 2019

Amtrak warns of delays as railways from Seattle to B.C. blocked by Wet’suwet’en supporters

Coastal GasLink said it’s signed benefits agreements with all 20 elected band councils along pipeline route

Nanaimo-bound ferry breaks down, but another available for service

Two sailings cancelled Sunday on Tsawwassen-Duke Point route

Most Read