Permit sought for cannabis recycling plant in Nanoose

No cultivation is involved

The Regional District of Nanaimo has received an application for a temporary use permit from a company that wants to operate a pharmaceutical grade cannabis recycling, extraction and testing facility on a property in Nanoose Bay.

RDN staff informed the electoral service committee that the application, once approved, will be good for three years with a one-time option to renew for another three years.

Protonify Corporation is applying for a federal licence with Health Canada which requires them to ensure that their plan will comply with local government land use regulations. However, the current zoning on their chosen property located on 1451 Island Highway East in Nanoose Bay and owned by William Court of Western Cruisers Sales Ltd., does not permit cannabis recycling, extracting and testing, requiring a temporary use permit.

According to RDN planner Nick Redpath, Protonify plans to use an existing vacant building for its operation, which will convert cannabis material into pharmaceutical grade ingredients through the extraction of tetrahydrocannabinolic acid in the form of a powder that is odourless, tasteless and colourless to be sold to licensed distributors and manufacturers of cannabis consumer products.

READ MORE: Cannabis prices up 17.3 per cent post-legalization

There is no cultivation of cannabis involved as all materials will be imported to the site from other licensed producers. The resulting residual material will be collected and disposed of offsite by a waste management company that specializes in the disposal of industrial and hazardous waste.

A public meeting was held on March 13 regarding this application.

Nine people attended the meeting chaired by Electoral Area E (Nanoose Bay) director Bob Rogers along with Redpath, and RDN manager of current planning Paul Thompson.

No written submissions were received.

Staff indicated that given that the proposed use is consistent with RDN Official Community Plan and Board policies, compatible with adjacent land uses and is not anticipated to have any significant negative impacts on adjacent properties or the environment, staff recommend that the board approve the TUP pending the outcome of public notifications to property owners surrounding the facility, and subject to the terms and conditions that have been outlined.

In approving the TUP, staff indicated the facility could provide local job opportunities and also promote economic health through the diversification of its regional economy.

Michael.Briones@pqbnews.com

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