A group of sheriffs hired in 2015 (BC Government Flickr)

3-year agreement for thousands of B.C. government workers

Deal covers staffing shortages for child-protection workers, deputy sheriffs, corrections officers

Thousands of British Columbia public service workers have ratified a three-year contract agreement giving them an annual 2 per cent wage increase.

The agreement covers workers who provide social, environmental and pubic safety services, as well as Liquor Distribution Branch employees and some of those who work at the BC Pension Corp.

The deal covers 26,500 workers and includes additional funds to help staffing shortages for child-protection workers, deputy sheriffs and corrections officers.

The government says in a news release that the contract also improves hiring and the process of classification so that the public service can respond to urgent government needs like accessible child care and affordable housing.

The B.C. Government and Service Employees’ Union says the contract was ratified by 62.7 per cent of those members who voted.

Union president Stephanie Smith says after 16 years of staff cuts and wage restraint, there is a lot of pent-up demand for positive change from the membership.

“We knew that we wouldn’t make up all the lost ground in one round of bargaining, but this agreement will provide a good foundation for us to build on.”

The latest contract means 91,000 public sector employees are covered by tentative or ratified agreements reached under the B.C. government’s sustainable management negotiating mandate.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

15 new Indigenous teacher training seats added at Cowichan VIU campus

Thorne said the new Indigenous teacher education curriculum that is planned at VIU

Cranberry fields not forever in British Columbia

Canadians consumed 2.6 kilograms fresh cranberries in 2016, but industry faces challenges

Port Alberni votes to change way council pay is increased

New way will focus on Consumer Price Index, future councils

Transplant caregiver starts website for financial, mental health support

Beth Campbell-Duke started Transplant Rouges after her husband’s double lung transplant

Andrea Rondeau column: Take a deep breath, and reflect on what’s really important

The one in my head goes like this: ‘Slow down, you move too fast’.

Windstorm topples tree onto townhouse in Nanaimo

Heavy winds have thousands of B.C. Hydro customers without power

Man dies after falling from B.C. bridge

Intoxicated man climbed railing, lost his balance and fell into the water below

B.C. animation team the ‘heart’ of new ‘Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse’

The animators, largely based in Vancouver, ultimately came up with a creative technique that is drawing praise

Light at the end of the tunnel for UN climate talks

Meeting in Katowice was meant to finalize how countries report their emissions of greenhouses gases

Janet Jackson, Def Leppard, Nicks join Rock Hall of Fame

Radiohead, the Cure, Roxy Music and the Zombies will also be ushered in at the 34th induction ceremony

Supreme Court affirms privacy rights for Canadians who share a computer

Section 8 of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms protects Canadians against unreasonable search and seizure

‘Ghost bikes’ installed to remember teen cyclists who died in Port Alberni

Cycle Alberni installs memorials to remember teens, remind all about road safety

Victoria in Canada’s top three cities for highest household debt

Rising interest rates could cause required payments to exceed budgets of highly indebted households

‘I practically begged’: Kootenay woman with breast cancer denied referral to Calgary

Breast cancer patient left to fight disease alone after being denied referral to Calgary

Most Read